Grant Applications

Just Imagine!

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library continues to grow in New Mexico. "Just Imagine!" provides training and support to local affiliates who want to give children 0-4 the gifts of book ownership.


The Imagination Library of Grant County is one of 2,200 local affiliates of Dolly Parton's Imagination Library. Each affiliate registers children to receive a free book each month, enters mailing information into the Dollywood Foundation's secure data base, and raises money to pay monthly book invoices. Since 2010 we've delivered over 117,000 books to babies, toddlers and preschoolers in Grant County. We've registered 80% of local children with the help of our partners. Research and parent surveys confirm that children benefit by becoming more interested in books, learning new vocabulary, spending more time with family members and scoring higher on reading proficiency tests. That's why we've grown the Imagination Library in New Mexico through our state expansion project, "Just Imagine!" With support from the FHL Foundation, we've advocated for partial state funding and offered financial support, 501c3 sponsorship and training for new affiliates. Since 2015, the number of children receiving books each month has more than tripled to include 13,452 children served by 35 active affiliates in 26 New Mexico counties. We've helped start affiliates in 14 counties and serve as fiscal sponsor for affiliates in Curry, Harding, and Eddy counties. We pay monthly book invoices for Quemado and Reserve School Districts in Catron County as well as Harding County. Our goal is to establish affiliates in the remaining 7 counties.


Grant Application
Imagination Library of Grant County Inc
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Just Imagine!
$185,000.00
$5,000.00
2.70%
Program Support
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
Dolly Parton's Imagination Library continues to grow in New Mexico. "Just Imagine!" provides training and support to local affiliates who want to give children 0-4 the gifts of book ownership.
The Imagination Library of Grant County is one of 2,200 local affiliates of Dolly Parton's Imagination Library. Each affiliate registers children to receive a free book each month, enters mailing information into the Dollywood Foundation's secure data base, and raises money to pay monthly book invoices. Since 2010 we've delivered over 117,000 books to babies, toddlers and preschoolers in Grant County. We've registered 80% of local children with the help of our partners. Research and parent surveys confirm that children benefit by becoming more interested in books, learning new vocabulary, spending more time with family members and scoring higher on reading proficiency tests. That's why we've grown the Imagination Library in New Mexico through our state expansion project, "Just Imagine!" With support from the FHL Foundation, we've advocated for partial state funding and offered financial support, 501c3 sponsorship and training for new affiliates. Since 2015, the number of children receiving books each month has more than tripled to include 13,452 children served by 35 active affiliates in 26 New Mexico counties. We've helped start affiliates in 14 counties and serve as fiscal sponsor for affiliates in Curry, Harding, and Eddy counties. We pay monthly book invoices for Quemado and Reserve School Districts in Catron County as well as Harding County. Our goal is to establish affiliates in the remaining 7 counties.
We have selected a tracking parameter that will track the number of children who will receive books during the project period. We are anticipating that approximately 15,000 children will be receiving books.
15,000
Bringing Remembrance Photography to the Medical Providers and Photographers of New Mexico

The primary focus of our programming is the support of photographers in NM, as well as bringing our medical provider training to the state in order to increase the number of bereaved families served.


NILMDTS will recruit, train, mobilize and retain professional-level photographers for the state of New Mexico. Additionally, NILMDTS will implement the new Medical Program in the state to train medical providers to photograph babies when we do not have a photographer available, or if it is a situation where it is not conducive to send a photographer. These programs rely heavily on our technology improvements. We want to make finding a photographer and/or using our Medical Program to be as easy as Uber, but with sensitivity and compassion. Photographers: We will continue our current efforts for recruiting and retaining our New Mexico photographers as well as evaluate and improve our strategies. We will continue to develop our robust training portal to provide further training for photographers on shooting and retouching sessions. Our live trainings continue to be a highlight for our volunteers. Additionally, the new technology will make the work of our volunteers seamless and easier to navigate which will improve retention. Medical: The Medical Program is just about to pilot in multiple cities. We are finishing the technology platform for nurses to directly upload photographs into our system where we provide the retouching. The training videos are complete and the course has been approved for contact hours for registered nurses. This will be available as continuing education for nurses in New Mexico as well, where we would like to do an in-person training in 2020.


Grant Application
Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Bringing Remembrance Photography to the Medical Providers and Photographers of New Mexico
$974,041.00
$18,000.00
1.80%
Start-Up
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
The primary focus of our programming is the support of photographers in NM, as well as bringing our medical provider training to the state in order to increase the number of bereaved families served.
NILMDTS will recruit, train, mobilize and retain professional-level photographers for the state of New Mexico. Additionally, NILMDTS will implement the new Medical Program in the state to train medical providers to photograph babies when we do not have a photographer available, or if it is a situation where it is not conducive to send a photographer. These programs rely heavily on our technology improvements. We want to make finding a photographer and/or using our Medical Program to be as easy as Uber, but with sensitivity and compassion. Photographers: We will continue our current efforts for recruiting and retaining our New Mexico photographers as well as evaluate and improve our strategies. We will continue to develop our robust training portal to provide further training for photographers on shooting and retouching sessions. Our live trainings continue to be a highlight for our volunteers. Additionally, the new technology will make the work of our volunteers seamless and easier to navigate which will improve retention. Medical: The Medical Program is just about to pilot in multiple cities. We are finishing the technology platform for nurses to directly upload photographs into our system where we provide the retouching. The training videos are complete and the course has been approved for contact hours for registered nurses. This will be available as continuing education for nurses in New Mexico as well, where we would like to do an in-person training in 2020.
The tracking parameter for our project is the number of medical providers and potential volunteers reached through our education and recruitment efforts. We expect to reach 200 medical providers and potential volunteers through our efforts.
200
Postsecondary Access Counseling

Bridges Project for Education offers college access programs that support first-generation, low-income, minority and nontraditional students of all ages to access and complete postsecondary education.


Since 1997, the heart of Bridges' postsecondary access programs has been free, one-on-one admissions and financial aid counseling. We've helped 3,000+ individuals work through applications and scholarships; and access financial aid to incur minimal debt. We strive to transform this complex process into achievable steps and reduce the intimidation that those new to this process often feel. We support high school counselors who have client loads of 400+. College Connections, our early awareness curriculum, teaches students career and postsecondary educational pathways, with strategies to achieve these in 8-12th grade. Our alumni support program combats low program completion rates in NM. We connect with Bridges alumni at pivotal points and support them as they're current college students, increasing their chance of graduating. Bridges primarily serves first-generation to college, low-income, minority and nontraditional students, like GED grads and older degree-seekers. Historic institutional injustices and a lack of knowledge about admissions and financial aid creates barriers for these underrepresented students, who are 66% less likely to obtain college degrees or vocational certifications than equally-qualified peers. Higher education disparities increase socioeconomic marginalization. Education is the most effective way out of poverty and degree completion - trade, two and four-year - benefits people with better health, income and civic engagement.


Grant Application
Bridges Project for Education
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Postsecondary Access Counseling
$159,136.00
$15,000.00
9.40%
General Operations
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
Bridges Project for Education offers college access programs that support first-generation, low-income, minority and nontraditional students of all ages to access and complete postsecondary education.
Since 1997, the heart of Bridges' postsecondary access programs has been free, one-on-one admissions and financial aid counseling. We've helped 3,000+ individuals work through applications and scholarships; and access financial aid to incur minimal debt. We strive to transform this complex process into achievable steps and reduce the intimidation that those new to this process often feel. We support high school counselors who have client loads of 400+. College Connections, our early awareness curriculum, teaches students career and postsecondary educational pathways, with strategies to achieve these in 8-12th grade. Our alumni support program combats low program completion rates in NM. We connect with Bridges alumni at pivotal points and support them as they're current college students, increasing their chance of graduating. Bridges primarily serves first-generation to college, low-income, minority and nontraditional students, like GED grads and older degree-seekers. Historic institutional injustices and a lack of knowledge about admissions and financial aid creates barriers for these underrepresented students, who are 66% less likely to obtain college degrees or vocational certifications than equally-qualified peers. Higher education disparities increase socioeconomic marginalization. Education is the most effective way out of poverty and degree completion - trade, two and four-year - benefits people with better health, income and civic engagement.
The metrics we would like to use to for our postsecondary access program is the number of students who will receive individualized counseling. We expect that 125 students will receive individualized postsecondary counseling.
125
Explora's Statewide Outreach program

Explora's Statewide Outreach program provides free, experiential STEM engagement that scaffolds school-time learning with hands-on educational experiences in underserved communities across New Mexico.


Explora respectfully requests continued FHL Foundation support to engage over 3,000 students living in tribal, rural, and remote areas of New Mexico in hands-on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning experiences. The 2020 Statewide Educational Outreach program increases student interest in and understanding of STEM through two mechanisms: 1) Classroom Explorations, 1-hour sessions inviting entire classrooms (20 students/1 adult per class x 2 classes per school) to take a deeper look at a specific STEM topic with materials-rich activities; and 2) Family Science Events, 2-hour bilingual community events where families (average of 70 students/30 adults) engage in mobile Explora exhibits together. Your support in 2019 enabled Explora to bring quality STEM education to 3,454 children living in communities without informal science education resources. With little to no access to experiential learning, these students score 23 points lower in standardized math tests compared to their more economically-advantaged peers (NM NAEP Results for 4th graders, 2019). By the 6th grade, these children will spend 6,000 less hours learning than middle-income peers, with over 4,000 of those lost hours accounted for by after school and summer programs (ExpandEDSchools, 2013). FHL remains critical to our efforts to level the playing field through visits to underserved communities across NM. Please continue to help us ignite curiosity, discovery, and the joy of lifelong learning.


Grant Application
Explora Science Center & Childrens Museum of Albuquerque
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Explora's Statewide Outreach program
$6,503,925.00
$20,000.00
0.30%
Program Support
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
Explora's Statewide Outreach program provides free, experiential STEM engagement that scaffolds school-time learning with hands-on educational experiences in underserved communities across New Mexico.
Explora respectfully requests continued FHL Foundation support to engage over 3,000 students living in tribal, rural, and remote areas of New Mexico in hands-on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning experiences. The 2020 Statewide Educational Outreach program increases student interest in and understanding of STEM through two mechanisms: 1) Classroom Explorations, 1-hour sessions inviting entire classrooms (20 students/1 adult per class x 2 classes per school) to take a deeper look at a specific STEM topic with materials-rich activities; and 2) Family Science Events, 2-hour bilingual community events where families (average of 70 students/30 adults) engage in mobile Explora exhibits together. Your support in 2019 enabled Explora to bring quality STEM education to 3,454 children living in communities without informal science education resources. With little to no access to experiential learning, these students score 23 points lower in standardized math tests compared to their more economically-advantaged peers (NM NAEP Results for 4th graders, 2019). By the 6th grade, these children will spend 6,000 less hours learning than middle-income peers, with over 4,000 of those lost hours accounted for by after school and summer programs (ExpandEDSchools, 2013). FHL remains critical to our efforts to level the playing field through visits to underserved communities across NM. Please continue to help us ignite curiosity, discovery, and the joy of lifelong learning.
The tracking metric that we would like to use is the number of individuals who will be receiving free STEM learning experiences during our project. We expect that 3000 individuals will be engaged in STEM learning experiences.
3,000
Guest Employment Program

A program to employ guests and former guests of the Interfaith Community Shelter, as part of our commitment to an array of services that help stabilize the lives of those experiencing homelessness.


The Interfaith Community Shelter strives to employ as many as possible of our former guests and current guests who are making the transition to permanent housing. Our refrain for this program is simple: "How could we as a homeless shelter encourage others to employ our guests if we are not willing to do it ourselves?" Currently, we have 7 people on staff who started as our guests. The experience they bring to the table is invaluable to the Shelter, and the job is valuable to them. These employees come to us with an array of special needs, as they continue to struggle, occasionally, to overcome the mental health and/or substance abuse issues that often resulted in their homelessness in the first place. This aspect of employing guests presents an extra challenge for management. But our guest employees also enrich the program with their talents and deep understanding that only comes from having experienced homelessness first-hand.


Grant Application
Interfaith Community Shelter Group, Inc.
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Guest Employment Program
$928,007.00
$15,000.00
1.60%
Program Support
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
A program to employ guests and former guests of the Interfaith Community Shelter, as part of our commitment to an array of services that help stabilize the lives of those experiencing homelessness.
The Interfaith Community Shelter strives to employ as many as possible of our former guests and current guests who are making the transition to permanent housing. Our refrain for this program is simple: "How could we as a homeless shelter encourage others to employ our guests if we are not willing to do it ourselves?" Currently, we have 7 people on staff who started as our guests. The experience they bring to the table is invaluable to the Shelter, and the job is valuable to them. These employees come to us with an array of special needs, as they continue to struggle, occasionally, to overcome the mental health and/or substance abuse issues that often resulted in their homelessness in the first place. This aspect of employing guests presents an extra challenge for management. But our guest employees also enrich the program with their talents and deep understanding that only comes from having experienced homelessness first-hand.
The tracking parameter that we would like to use to track our Guest Employment Program is the number of overnight guests which will be served. We expect to serve 1,000 of overnight guests during the duration of our project.
1,000
Capital Improvement: Worry Less Wrinkless - Replacing the unipress in the main laundry

Little Sisters of the Poor have served the elderly poor in Gallup, NM since 1983 providing them with love, respect and compassion.


Little Sisters of the Poor--we were founded in France in 1839 by St. Jeanne Jugan who welcomed into her Home an elderly woman who was blind, poor, and paralyzed. Carrying her up a spiral staircase, Jeanne gave Ann her bed--the beginning of our Mission to the elderly. Soon after, Jeanne jugan would welcome other elderly persons into her Home, many of whom were beggars. In turn, Jeanne would go out begging on their behalf and was able to establish a network of benefactors to support her work. We have been in the United States serving the elderly poor for over 150 years and have several Home for the elderly throughout the US and the world. We have been here in Gallup, NM for 36 years. Part of our Mission here is to care for the elderly wo are Native American, many of whom come from nearby reservations, including the Navajo. The rest of the Home's Residents are drawn from Gallup's large low-income elderly population. In our Assisted Living Home and Independent Apartments, we are able grateful to be able to welcome 47 elderly Residents.


Grant Application
Little Sisters of the Poor/Villa Guadalupe
Winter 2020 Grant Cycle
Capital Improvement: Worry Less Wrinkless - Replacing the unipress in the main laundry
$1,366,592.00
$14,400.00
1.00%
General Operations
Feb. 28th, 2020
Dec. 31st, 2020
Little Sisters of the Poor have served the elderly poor in Gallup, NM since 1983 providing them with love, respect and compassion.
Little Sisters of the Poor--we were founded in France in 1839 by St. Jeanne Jugan who welcomed into her Home an elderly woman who was blind, poor, and paralyzed. Carrying her up a spiral staircase, Jeanne gave Ann her bed--the beginning of our Mission to the elderly. Soon after, Jeanne jugan would welcome other elderly persons into her Home, many of whom were beggars. In turn, Jeanne would go out begging on their behalf and was able to establish a network of benefactors to support her work. We have been in the United States serving the elderly poor for over 150 years and have several Home for the elderly throughout the US and the world. We have been here in Gallup, NM for 36 years. Part of our Mission here is to care for the elderly wo are Native American, many of whom come from nearby reservations, including the Navajo. The rest of the Home's Residents are drawn from Gallup's large low-income elderly population. In our Assisted Living Home and Independent Apartments, we are able grateful to be able to welcome 47 elderly Residents.
The tracking parameters are the number of residents who will use the unipress iron. We expect that 47 elderly residents will use the unipress iron.
47
COVID-19 Response

In response to COVID-19, we will hire staff, purchase technology for distance learning, renovate our facility’s athletic and indoor areas, and secure funds for constant sanitation of facilities.


East Gate needs financial support to offer underprivileged children the education they need to resume their academic growth, which was interrupted by the pandemic. COVID-19 has limited the number of individuals hosted in each space, imposed social distancing protocols, extended our schedule to full-day programs, and relocated our physical exercise component. Additional funds will sustain salaries of teachers who are working overtime, hire one new full-time staff member and two part-time staff members, purchase technology for students and staff, and maintain high-standard hygiene conditions. Also due to COVID, we must equip our teachers with additional mobile technologies that will enable them to participate in remote coordination of programs. To fill the academic gaps of children who are suffering significant losses in learning due to school lockdowns, East Gate must strengthen our programs' academic component, particularly our literacy and mathematics courses. We will purchase new curriculum and technology for each child to access virtual learning platforms remotely. Our after-school and summer programs have been redesigned. We have lost the vital field trip component based on destinations, including the swimming pool and other athletic spaces. We must equip our outdoor space so as to maintain the athletic component of our programs that enables children to develop physical fitness, and improve our indoor spaces in order to offer more extracurricular activities.


Grant Application
East Gate Kids Learning Center
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
COVID-19 Response
$201,830.00
$10,000.00
4.95%
Capacity Building
Dec. 1st, 2020
Nov. 30th, 2021
In response to COVID-19, we will hire staff, purchase technology for distance learning, renovate our facility’s athletic and indoor areas, and secure funds for constant sanitation of facilities.
East Gate needs financial support to offer underprivileged children the education they need to resume their academic growth, which was interrupted by the pandemic. COVID-19 has limited the number of individuals hosted in each space, imposed social distancing protocols, extended our schedule to full-day programs, and relocated our physical exercise component. Additional funds will sustain salaries of teachers who are working overtime, hire one new full-time staff member and two part-time staff members, purchase technology for students and staff, and maintain high-standard hygiene conditions. Also due to COVID, we must equip our teachers with additional mobile technologies that will enable them to participate in remote coordination of programs. To fill the academic gaps of children who are suffering significant losses in learning due to school lockdowns, East Gate must strengthen our programs' academic component, particularly our literacy and mathematics courses. We will purchase new curriculum and technology for each child to access virtual learning platforms remotely. Our after-school and summer programs have been redesigned. We have lost the vital field trip component based on destinations, including the swimming pool and other athletic spaces. We must equip our outdoor space so as to maintain the athletic component of our programs that enables children to develop physical fitness, and improve our indoor spaces in order to offer more extracurricular activities.
EXPENSES Personnel Teacher / Program Administrator (full-time): $35,000 Teacher / Program Assistant (part-time): $15,000 Teacher / Program Assistant (part-time): $15,000 Full-Time Janitor: $16,000 Full-Time Janitor: $16,000 Employee Benefits and Taxes: $7,500 Course Supplies Habitudes Curriculum for Middle School Students: $20,000 Co-Starters Curriculum for Middle School students: $10,000 20 Chromebooks for Students and Teachers: $6,000 Stipends for Guest Speakers: $2,400 Infrastructure for Outdoor Athletic Space and Indoor After-School Programs Basketball Court Renovation: $21,000 Volleyball Court Renovation: $2,880 Cinderblock Wall Construction: $15,450 Garage Door: $7,000 Replace Damaged Wood Doors in Youth Room: $12,600 TOTAL EXPENSE: $201,830 REVENUE Pending: Albuquerque Community Foundation: $25,000 All Together NM Fund: $5,000 Brabson Library and Educational Foundation: $10,000 Educators of America: $5,000 Frederick H. Leonhardt Foundation, Inc.: $10,000 Frost Foundation: $20,000 Hancock Family Foundation: $10,000 McCune Charitable Foundation: $20,000 Nintendo of America Inc.: $20,000 Sony Corporation of America: $20,000 Community Contributions: $17,000 Secured: East Gate Kids Tuition and Fees: $40,000 TOTAL REVENUE: 202,000
Photographs of the facility/athletic area will show improvements. New staff resumes will act as proof of hire. The number of students using athletic facility and participating in online curriculum will be tracked, with the goal of 200 students.
200
Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Program

We are requesting support for our CASA volunteer recruiting and training efforts to ensure we can replace volunteers we have lost due to the current COVID-19 pandemic situation.


Child welfare experts fear children are at increased risk for abuse and neglect due to the pressures many families are under during the pandemic. In addition, many children are no longer regularly in settings (day cares, schools) where abuse is recognized and reported. Both of these factors indicate that as society recovers from the pandemic and resumes some normalcy, we will likely experience a spike in child abuse and an increase in the number of foster children. For this reason, it is vital that New Mexico Kids Matter is able to continue to recruit, train, and deploy CASAs to serve our community’s most vulnerable children. Unfortunately, we have lost approximately 15% of the total number of CASAs we had just prior to the start of the pandemic. Volunteers are leaving for a number of reasons directly related to the pandemic: some are not comfortable with technology and disliked doing their advocacy work in our current virtual environment; others have had to devote more time to at-home schooling for their own children; and some are in high risk categories for COVID-19 and have decided they will not be comfortable doing their work in-person as we hopefully move towards less virtual and more face-to-face advocacy efforts in the coming months. With support from the FHL Foundation, we will be able to continue to aggressively recruit and train new CASA volunteers (virtually now and in-person when the health situation allows) to advocate for abused and neglected foster children.


Grant Application
New Mexico Kids Matter Inc.
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Program
$734,500.00
$20,000.00
2.72%
Program Support
Dec. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
We are requesting support for our CASA volunteer recruiting and training efforts to ensure we can replace volunteers we have lost due to the current COVID-19 pandemic situation.
Child welfare experts fear children are at increased risk for abuse and neglect due to the pressures many families are under during the pandemic. In addition, many children are no longer regularly in settings (day cares, schools) where abuse is recognized and reported. Both of these factors indicate that as society recovers from the pandemic and resumes some normalcy, we will likely experience a spike in child abuse and an increase in the number of foster children. For this reason, it is vital that New Mexico Kids Matter is able to continue to recruit, train, and deploy CASAs to serve our community’s most vulnerable children. Unfortunately, we have lost approximately 15% of the total number of CASAs we had just prior to the start of the pandemic. Volunteers are leaving for a number of reasons directly related to the pandemic: some are not comfortable with technology and disliked doing their advocacy work in our current virtual environment; others have had to devote more time to at-home schooling for their own children; and some are in high risk categories for COVID-19 and have decided they will not be comfortable doing their work in-person as we hopefully move towards less virtual and more face-to-face advocacy efforts in the coming months. With support from the FHL Foundation, we will be able to continue to aggressively recruit and train new CASA volunteers (virtually now and in-person when the health situation allows) to advocate for abused and neglected foster children.
Although all CASAs are volunteers, the average cost for New Mexico Kids Matter to provide a CASA volunteer to one child for one year is $2,800. This covers recruitment, training, staff support, and other direct and indirect expenses related to our CASA program. Funding requested with this grant application will be used to support our volunteer recruiting and training efforts. We will use approximately $10,000 of the requested funding to cover volunteer recruiting costs such as print, television, radio, and social media advertising, marketing and public relations materials, and expenses (registration fees, etc.) for participation in community events (as the public health situation allows) used for recruiting purposes. The remaining approximately $10,000 of the requested funding will cover the costs of offering 15-18 volunteer training sessions and training at least 50 new CASA volunteers (at a cost of $200 per volunteer trained) during the grant period.
Number of new CASA volunteers trained and deployed to serve foster children in during the grant period.
50
COVID Art Journaling Project

The COVID Journaling Project helps youth cope with anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues using CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) and art to facilitate resiliency and mental well-being.


Over 29 percent of young people in the U.S., ages 9-17, are affected by anxiety and depression disorders. The NM Department of Health revealed that in 2016, New Mexico had the fourth-highest suicide rate in the country and is consistently 50% higher than the U.S. rate. According to the same report, one-third of SJC high school youth reported feeling sad and hopeless. COVID has only exacerbated these health concerns. Using art as a medium, Inspire heART provides students a safe environment to explore and express emotions, thoughts, and ideas, as well as the expression of thoughts and feelings and to enhance individual development and growth. Learning to express oneself through art can improve overall well-being and contribute to lowering anxiety and stress, encourage self-awareness and self-esteem, strengthen relationships, regulate behaviors, and enhance social skills. Expression through art can also positively impact student function, mood, and cognition. Art therapy supports the interaction of complex thought processes, empowers youth through the development of autonomy and self-efficacy, and helps youth gain a sense of control. In response to social distancing regulations, the nonprofit is partnering with American Indian Health and SJC school districts to provide more than 3,500 students a three-week intensive online art journaling project. These lessons will aid students who are dealing with the adverse effects of COVID, including isolation, anxiety, and depression.


Grant Application
Inspire heART, Inc.
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
COVID Art Journaling Project
$119,040.00
$30,000.00
25.20%
Program Support
Oct. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
The COVID Journaling Project helps youth cope with anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues using CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) and art to facilitate resiliency and mental well-being.
Over 29 percent of young people in the U.S., ages 9-17, are affected by anxiety and depression disorders. The NM Department of Health revealed that in 2016, New Mexico had the fourth-highest suicide rate in the country and is consistently 50% higher than the U.S. rate. According to the same report, one-third of SJC high school youth reported feeling sad and hopeless. COVID has only exacerbated these health concerns. Using art as a medium, Inspire heART provides students a safe environment to explore and express emotions, thoughts, and ideas, as well as the expression of thoughts and feelings and to enhance individual development and growth. Learning to express oneself through art can improve overall well-being and contribute to lowering anxiety and stress, encourage self-awareness and self-esteem, strengthen relationships, regulate behaviors, and enhance social skills. Expression through art can also positively impact student function, mood, and cognition. Art therapy supports the interaction of complex thought processes, empowers youth through the development of autonomy and self-efficacy, and helps youth gain a sense of control. In response to social distancing regulations, the nonprofit is partnering with American Indian Health and SJC school districts to provide more than 3,500 students a three-week intensive online art journaling project. These lessons will aid students who are dealing with the adverse effects of COVID, including isolation, anxiety, and depression.
Inspire heART is an almost entirely volunteer-led organization and provides its services to schools, organizations, and students, free of charge. Ninety-two percent of Inspire’s budget goes towards program expenses; 73% towards art materials. Inspire heART is seeking $30,000 to help offset the cost of art materials for its COVID Journaling Project. The cost breakdown is $30 per student and covers the art journal, art supplies, art lessons, and journaling prompts for each student, as well as guidance and support from Inspire heART instructors and schoolteachers. Project beneficiaries will include:  American Indian Health Youth Suicide Prevention (Indian Reservation): 120 students at $3,600  Heights Middle School (Farmington Municipal School District): 750 students at $22,500  Aztec High School (Aztec Municipal School District): 881 students at $26,430  Newcomb High School (Newcomb Central School District): 216 students at $6,480  Shiprock High School (Central Consolidated School District): 665 students at $19,950  Farmington High School (Farmington Municipal School District) 1,336 students at $40,080 Total number of students to be served = 3,968 Total Cost = $119,040
Inspire heART will track the number of students served, as well as qualitative data, including testimonies and impact stories, to measure the success of the project and how well we were able to help students cope with isolation during COVID.
3,968
Nuclear Museum Extended Care/Distanced Learning Support and STEM Programming

The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History respectfully requests $10,000 from the FHL Foundation to support Extended Care/Distanced Learning and STEM programming.


On 9/8 the Museum began offering an Extended Care Program for distanced learning support for the 2020-21 school year. According to NMPED, all school districts will follow a phased approach to reentry, beginning school completely online, followed by a later hybrid schedule. The Museum is accepting a limited number of K-7 students M-F from 7:30 am - 5:30 pm. This in-person program offers a balance between online distance learning with the child’s school, STEM specific curricula/activities provided by the museum, and fun physical activities each day. Students are asked to bring their school Chrome Books/Google Access login information for their school assignments (or other login information if a different platform is used), lunch, snacks, a face mask to be worn at all times, and a refillable water bottle. Students are welcome to bring their own electronic device to do schoolwork, but the Museum is also able to provide electronic device if necessary. Program hours may change as NMPED district reentry phases unfold. Safety of the students and museum educators is of utmost importance. Health and Safety protocols, including cleaning procedures, will be strictly enforced during all programs. In past years, the Museum has offered “Science is Everywhere” experiential STEM camps for school breaks, holidays, and additional days off. The Museum will continue to offer in-person camps, following the same capacity limits and health/safety regulations as the Extended Care Program.


Grant Application
National Atomic Museum Foundation
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Nuclear Museum Extended Care/Distanced Learning Support and STEM Programming
$60,000.00
$10,000.00
16.67%
Program Support
Nov. 2nd, 2020
Nov. 1st, 2021
The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History respectfully requests $10,000 from the FHL Foundation to support Extended Care/Distanced Learning and STEM programming.
On 9/8 the Museum began offering an Extended Care Program for distanced learning support for the 2020-21 school year. According to NMPED, all school districts will follow a phased approach to reentry, beginning school completely online, followed by a later hybrid schedule. The Museum is accepting a limited number of K-7 students M-F from 7:30 am - 5:30 pm. This in-person program offers a balance between online distance learning with the child’s school, STEM specific curricula/activities provided by the museum, and fun physical activities each day. Students are asked to bring their school Chrome Books/Google Access login information for their school assignments (or other login information if a different platform is used), lunch, snacks, a face mask to be worn at all times, and a refillable water bottle. Students are welcome to bring their own electronic device to do schoolwork, but the Museum is also able to provide electronic device if necessary. Program hours may change as NMPED district reentry phases unfold. Safety of the students and museum educators is of utmost importance. Health and Safety protocols, including cleaning procedures, will be strictly enforced during all programs. In past years, the Museum has offered “Science is Everywhere” experiential STEM camps for school breaks, holidays, and additional days off. The Museum will continue to offer in-person camps, following the same capacity limits and health/safety regulations as the Extended Care Program.
On 3/17/20 the Museum closed its doors to the public. All events, school visits, outreach visits, and in-person spring and summer break camps were cancelled. The Museum remained closed to the public for almost six months due to the state of NM health regulations and restrictions. The Museum officially reopened on 8/31/20 at 25% capacity. Although the Museum is now open to the public and will begin to generate some revenue, the operating budget for FY21 (October 1, 2020 to September 30, 2021) will need to be greatly adjusted and will be much lower due to the uncertainty of COVID19. The Extended Care and STEM programming budget consists of administrative and material costs. The Museum currently has three part time Museum Educators and one Education Director. We are asking $3,500 for administrative costs to support part time staff wages and 6,500 for supplies/materials. Part time Museum Educator hourly wage is $18. Due to COVID19, the turnover rate of simple supplies and materials will be much higher. Program materials include (but will not limited to) crayons, markers, colored pencils, paper, digital platforms (such as ZOOM and Brain Chase), and other consumables for distanced learning and STEM based activities. The program will be utilizing a high amount of cleaning supplies including, but not limited to, bleach, disposable gloves and masks, disinfectant spray, hand sanitizer, paper towels, and sanitizing wipes.
The Museum is currently accepting a max of 20 children per day with a 1:5 ratio. Tracking through attendance, repeat attendance, informal feedback and surveys. Below is our estimate (including repeat attendance) for 2020-21 school year.
2,500
Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic Pet Save Fund

We request a grant for the Pet Save Fund of our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic to help low-income clients who are struggling to pay for their pets’ care during this difficult time.


Our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic is the only full-service, discounted clinic exclusively for low-income families and their pets in the state. It plays a crucial role in ensuring that pets stay healthy and with their loving families by providing care for those who cannot afford to take their pets to a private veterinarian. We believe that pets are important family members, especially for under-served communities. We want to support our clients in keeping their pets with them for the long-term, rather than surrendering them because they cannot afford quality care. Pet owners qualify based on proof that their household income is no more than 238% of Federal poverty guidelines. While clients do pay fees for services, our costs are 35% - 50% below what for-profit clinics charge. Pets receive the full range of services they would at for-profit clinics. By offering care at below-market rates, we make it possible for our clients to receive preventative and early care before an issue becomes an urgent health crisis; saving money, time and stress on the owner’s part and reducing pain and suffering on the pet’s. Some clients struggle to pay even our deeply-discounted rates. For them, we can further discount their payments through the Pet Save Fund, which is fully funded by generous donors.


Grant Application
Animal Humane Association of New Mexico, Inc.
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic Pet Save Fund
$1,503,996.00
$10,000.00
1.00%
Program Support
Dec. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
We request a grant for the Pet Save Fund of our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic to help low-income clients who are struggling to pay for their pets’ care during this difficult time.
Our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic is the only full-service, discounted clinic exclusively for low-income families and their pets in the state. It plays a crucial role in ensuring that pets stay healthy and with their loving families by providing care for those who cannot afford to take their pets to a private veterinarian. We believe that pets are important family members, especially for under-served communities. We want to support our clients in keeping their pets with them for the long-term, rather than surrendering them because they cannot afford quality care. Pet owners qualify based on proof that their household income is no more than 238% of Federal poverty guidelines. While clients do pay fees for services, our costs are 35% - 50% below what for-profit clinics charge. Pets receive the full range of services they would at for-profit clinics. By offering care at below-market rates, we make it possible for our clients to receive preventative and early care before an issue becomes an urgent health crisis; saving money, time and stress on the owner’s part and reducing pain and suffering on the pet’s. Some clients struggle to pay even our deeply-discounted rates. For them, we can further discount their payments through the Pet Save Fund, which is fully funded by generous donors.
A $10,000 grant for the Pet Save Fund would help reduce the veterinary bills for 66 low-income clients, based on an average discount of $150 per case. As in all aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the low-income people and pets we serve have been particularly impacted. As a population that normally struggles with access to care, our clients are also experiencing increased food-insecurity, lost wages, and trouble paying for housing. The benefits of the human/pet bond have been well-documented. For many, their beloved pet may be their only relationship. Pets, especially in times of difficulty and loneliness, provide companionship, stress-reduction, and increased physical activity. We often hear from clients that their pet is their main motivation to get up in the morning and keep going. When low-income pet owners are struggling financially, they may defer care for themselves or their pet, skip meals for themselves or be forced to make the sad decision to surrender their pet in the hopes that, by doing so, their pet will receive the veterinary care they are not able to afford. A grant from the Frederick H. Leonhardt Foundation to the Pet Save Fund would help cover veterinary services including wellness/preventative care, medical treatment/management, dental care, spay/neuter, special surgery and diagnostics. Pet Save Funds are applied based on our staff veterinarians’ discretion because they are familiar with the clients, their pets and their unique circumstances.
help reduce the veterinary bills for low-income clients
66
The Virtual Literacy Challenge

Reading Works will construct new student intake and assessment systems and build a long-term remote tutoring component. FHL's grant will improve literacy service delivery beyond the COVID crisis.


To effectively meet our mission, we are making changes in program delivery: • virtual student intake and assessment • long-term remote tutoring. Student intakes and assessments are essential to provide quality literacy services. We use the information gathered in these sessions to create individual education plans that are tailored to each student's goals, needs, and reading/language level. Because we can no longer meet with students face-to-face, we have to create something new. We will make virtual intakes/assessments part of our process permanently. This will add another level of accessibility for students who lack transportation or time to come to our office. In March 2020, 60% of our students wanted to continue tutoring despite the disruption COVID caused in their lives. By May volunteer tutors and students were meeting using smartphone apps, Google Duo, Zoom, and regular old-fashioned telephone calls. We discovered both tutors and students have technological and digital needs in order to meet remotely: equipment, internet access, training on how to teach and learn in this new way. We developed a new staff position - Student Intake and Curriculum Development Coordinator - to tackle these issues. Building these new systems will advance our mission into the future and help Reading Works be a more sustainable and effective organization.


Grant Application
Reading Works, Inc.
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
The Virtual Literacy Challenge
$184,770.00
$7,750.00
4.00%
Capacity Building
Dec. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
Reading Works will construct new student intake and assessment systems and build a long-term remote tutoring component. FHL's grant will improve literacy service delivery beyond the COVID crisis.
To effectively meet our mission, we are making changes in program delivery: • virtual student intake and assessment • long-term remote tutoring. Student intakes and assessments are essential to provide quality literacy services. We use the information gathered in these sessions to create individual education plans that are tailored to each student's goals, needs, and reading/language level. Because we can no longer meet with students face-to-face, we have to create something new. We will make virtual intakes/assessments part of our process permanently. This will add another level of accessibility for students who lack transportation or time to come to our office. In March 2020, 60% of our students wanted to continue tutoring despite the disruption COVID caused in their lives. By May volunteer tutors and students were meeting using smartphone apps, Google Duo, Zoom, and regular old-fashioned telephone calls. We discovered both tutors and students have technological and digital needs in order to meet remotely: equipment, internet access, training on how to teach and learn in this new way. We developed a new staff position - Student Intake and Curriculum Development Coordinator - to tackle these issues. Building these new systems will advance our mission into the future and help Reading Works be a more sustainable and effective organization.
Student Intake and Curriculum Development Coordinator. 330 hours @ $15 = $4,950 Purchase tablets to lend to students for remote and digital learning. 20 tablets @ $140 = $2,800
number of students served
150
COVID-19 Adaptation: Movement + Mentorship = Metamorphosis (M3)

Funding will support the development/implementation of a hybrid version of Keshet’s current in-person academic curriculum within juvenile prisons, to facilitate distance learning during the pandemic.


Keshet’s Movement + Mentorship = Metamorphosis (M3) is a physically-based, academic curriculum taught to 100 incarcerated youth (ages 12-21) in Bernalillo County at the accredited Foothill High School, located at the Youth Diagnostic and Development Center. The program teaches math, science, literacy, and conflict resolution skills to incarcerated youth through onsite classes. Clients include youth who are either currently incarcerated or are transitioning through the parole and reintegration process. All youth come from families with high risk factors including abuse, familial incarceration, homelessness, single parent families, and low income levels. Professional artists work alongside the kids to provide them with academic and social skills, mentorship, and a positive self-image. Funding ($15,000) is requested to support the development and implementation of an adaptable, hybrid distance-learning curriculum in order to transition this education program between in-person and virtual, as needed, during the COVID-19 pandemic. The youth served by this program are extremely vulnerable; the critical nature of their situation requires attentive, one-on-one follow up during periods of remote learning. Funds will also support consistent phone contact with students which is tied to the curriculum/daily academic lessons, and serves to connect students with a supporter on the outside (there is no consistent format in place for any additional access to families/attorneys right now).


Grant Application
Keshet Dance Company
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
COVID-19 Adaptation: Movement + Mentorship = Metamorphosis (M3)
$157,200.00
$15,000.00
9.54%
Program Support
Nov. 30th, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
Funding will support the development/implementation of a hybrid version of Keshet’s current in-person academic curriculum within juvenile prisons, to facilitate distance learning during the pandemic.
Keshet’s Movement + Mentorship = Metamorphosis (M3) is a physically-based, academic curriculum taught to 100 incarcerated youth (ages 12-21) in Bernalillo County at the accredited Foothill High School, located at the Youth Diagnostic and Development Center. The program teaches math, science, literacy, and conflict resolution skills to incarcerated youth through onsite classes. Clients include youth who are either currently incarcerated or are transitioning through the parole and reintegration process. All youth come from families with high risk factors including abuse, familial incarceration, homelessness, single parent families, and low income levels. Professional artists work alongside the kids to provide them with academic and social skills, mentorship, and a positive self-image. Funding ($15,000) is requested to support the development and implementation of an adaptable, hybrid distance-learning curriculum in order to transition this education program between in-person and virtual, as needed, during the COVID-19 pandemic. The youth served by this program are extremely vulnerable; the critical nature of their situation requires attentive, one-on-one follow up during periods of remote learning. Funds will also support consistent phone contact with students which is tied to the curriculum/daily academic lessons, and serves to connect students with a supporter on the outside (there is no consistent format in place for any additional access to families/attorneys right now).
Program expenses include: Salaries ($149,000): Artist-Mentors (FTE 100% - includes curriculum development and implementation - $123,000); Data/Evaluation Manager (FTE 15% - $5,000); Program Coordinator (FTE 40% - $15,500); and Artistic Director (FTE 10% - $5,500). Supplies/ Equipment - $200. Other Expenses: includes technological devices for underserved/Post Release Program Youth Leaders participating in the NM Arts & Justice Network - $8,000. Total expenses: $157,200. Anticipated funding includes: Government Funding (Confirmed - $50,000); Nusenda (Confirmed - $5,000); United Way (Confirmed - $50,000); Sandia Foundation (Confirmed - $8,300); and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Confirmed - $10,900). Pending funding includes ACF Emergency Action Fund (Pending - $18,000) and FHL Foundation (Proposed - $15,000). Funding will enable Keshet to double its curriculum output (from 264 hours/semester to 528 hours/semester of total curriculum development) in order to have flexible models which are ready to adapt daily to any in-person, remote, or hybrid situation, depending on where we are in pandemic-related restrictions.
100 incarcerated youth will participate in the M3 Program; by the end of the project period, 80% of participants will track a 25% increase on academic test scores (math, literacy, and science) based on pre and post academic testing.
100
Breath of My Heart COVID Response

BMH is an Espanola Valley birth center that works to improve maternal and infant health outcomes in rural communities by serving families through a culturally-appropriate midwifery model of care.


BMH has maintained all of its programs during this time, and increased capacity in many areas. Our walk-in clinic has been adapted to meter the flow of clients while still accepting same-day visits. Our midwifery practice has seen an increase in clients, including many late transfers from other providers who are inhibited by hospital restrictions. We are expanding services to well-newborns, in response to decreased availability of these services in our community. Our food distribution program, formerly a small aspect of our program, has significantly increased in response to food access issues in our community and we provide regular distribution to 20-30 families per week with half delivered directly to families’ homes. We have started an emergency baby supply bank for Young Parents, which provides access to essential items and reduces their need to shop frequently because of cash-flow problems. We have maintained work with the Young Parents support group despite having to meet virtually. The group has started a digital storytelling project that will capture their lived experiences of parenting and build their capacity in media arts. Our policy work continues, with urgent responses to the changing landscape of Medicaid and the department of health. We are advocating for inclusion of Licensed Midwives in pandemic policy creation while also promoting access to midwifery care as part of a much needed emergency response plan that includes the needs of birthing people.


Grant Application
Breath of My Heart
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Breath of My Heart COVID Response
$439,600.00
$15,000.00
3.41%
General Operations
Dec. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
BMH is an Espanola Valley birth center that works to improve maternal and infant health outcomes in rural communities by serving families through a culturally-appropriate midwifery model of care.
BMH has maintained all of its programs during this time, and increased capacity in many areas. Our walk-in clinic has been adapted to meter the flow of clients while still accepting same-day visits. Our midwifery practice has seen an increase in clients, including many late transfers from other providers who are inhibited by hospital restrictions. We are expanding services to well-newborns, in response to decreased availability of these services in our community. Our food distribution program, formerly a small aspect of our program, has significantly increased in response to food access issues in our community and we provide regular distribution to 20-30 families per week with half delivered directly to families’ homes. We have started an emergency baby supply bank for Young Parents, which provides access to essential items and reduces their need to shop frequently because of cash-flow problems. We have maintained work with the Young Parents support group despite having to meet virtually. The group has started a digital storytelling project that will capture their lived experiences of parenting and build their capacity in media arts. Our policy work continues, with urgent responses to the changing landscape of Medicaid and the department of health. We are advocating for inclusion of Licensed Midwives in pandemic policy creation while also promoting access to midwifery care as part of a much needed emergency response plan that includes the needs of birthing people.
BMH is requesting general operating funds to help us scale our staffing to meet the increased demands of the pandemic. We have identified the need for an additional full time staff midwife and additional administrative support staff, to maintain our response to the pandemic. Our staff, along with our fellow community members, carry a high trauma burden overall and this time is incredibly stressful. We have revised our 18 month staffing plan to reflect the increased need for clinical providers while providing them with time off-call to support their families and themselves to stay well during these unprecedented times. Funds will be used largely to increase staffing and to a lesser extent for flexible spending in response to the emergency needs of our clients. Food distribution and supplies (including emergency contraception) are areas where we have seen a sharp increase in demand during this time. The 2020 year has brought unexpected changes to our budget. We have received emergency funding through various sources for COVID-19 response totalling approximately $20K. We anticipate our grassroots fundraising will be negatively impacted this year since we are unable to convene the events we had planned. We also anticipate that Medicaid will be significantly impacted by the impending state budget shortfall and that this could impact our fee-for-service income.
$5,000 can be used for to pay employees and infrastructure items $10,000 needs to be used for the distribution of the goods themselves for families in need
625
Wish Granting in New Mexico

Make-A-Wish New Mexico is requesting $10,000 to grant a wish for a child with a critical illness in New Mexico.


COVID-19 has greatly impacted our organization’s ability to grant wishes. Because of travel restrictions and businesses closing their doors, twenty-one scheduled wishes have been postponed. Our organization is prioritizing securing funding for these twenty-one waiting wishes. When our organization can safely grant these wishes, we do not want our wish children to wait a day longer than they already have because of lack of funding. In the fight against a critical illness, each wish serves as an urgent catalyst for renewed strength and encouragement for every child and family on their journey. Children are energized by wishes. They can anticipate, describe, imagine, plan, and eventually rejoice in its fruition. By demonstrating that a wish can come true, we encourage a child to envision a positive future and to remain an active partner in treatment when courage and hope begin to fade. We believe wishes improve the odds for wish kids fighting critical illnesses. Wishes inspire and have the power to change lives. Wishes help kids look past their limitations, families overcome anxiety and entire communities experience joy. Most importantly, wishes can improve a child's quality of life, giving them a better chance of recovering.


Grant Application
Make-A-Wish Foundation of New Mexico
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Wish Granting in New Mexico
$210,000.00
$10,000.00
4.76%
Program Support
Dec. 31st, 2020
Jul. 30th, 2021
Make-A-Wish New Mexico is requesting $10,000 to grant a wish for a child with a critical illness in New Mexico.
COVID-19 has greatly impacted our organization’s ability to grant wishes. Because of travel restrictions and businesses closing their doors, twenty-one scheduled wishes have been postponed. Our organization is prioritizing securing funding for these twenty-one waiting wishes. When our organization can safely grant these wishes, we do not want our wish children to wait a day longer than they already have because of lack of funding. In the fight against a critical illness, each wish serves as an urgent catalyst for renewed strength and encouragement for every child and family on their journey. Children are energized by wishes. They can anticipate, describe, imagine, plan, and eventually rejoice in its fruition. By demonstrating that a wish can come true, we encourage a child to envision a positive future and to remain an active partner in treatment when courage and hope begin to fade. We believe wishes improve the odds for wish kids fighting critical illnesses. Wishes inspire and have the power to change lives. Wishes help kids look past their limitations, families overcome anxiety and entire communities experience joy. Most importantly, wishes can improve a child's quality of life, giving them a better chance of recovering.
The average cost of a wish for our chapter is $10,000. Because we have twenty-one waiting wishes, we are prioritizing securing $210,000 to successfully grant these wishes. Like many nonprofits, the cancelation of in-person events has been detrimental to our organization. Three major fundraising events that contribute to 17% of our cash revenue were canceled. Make-A-Wish New Mexico relies on the generous contributions of individuals and grants to make life-changing wishes possible. At Make-A-Wish New Mexico, we take our responsibility for the monies donated to our cause very seriously and are pleased to confirm that according to the fiscal year 2019 audit results, Make-A-Wish Foundation New Mexico spent 85% of every dollar on wish granting and related program expenses. Only 6% of every dollar was spent on management and general costs and 9% was allocated to fundraising.
Dedicated program staff work closely with families during their wish process. After a wish is granted, families complete a ‘wish evaluation form.’ This form provides valuable qualitative data that allows us improve our program.
1
Saranam

Requested funds support on-call IT support for our organization and all families to access programming, as well as rehabilitating the Family Center backyard to accommodate small group meetings.


Saranam, a transitional living program for homeless families, has continued to remain operational during the COVID-19 crisis to provide families in our transitional living program with a safe home, household/cleaning supplies, adequate food supplies, case management, and educational opportunities. In August we welcomed 10 new families into the program despite the financial challenges we encountered from having fundraising interrupted. Saranam families are especially vulnerable during the pandemic, and Saranam ensures their needs are met. Saranam has adapted programming and developed virtual solutions to connect and support our families during COVID-19. We provide case management several times weekly via phone or Zoom to provide encouragement and support to families, and hold life skills classes, children’s activities, and community meetings virtually via Zoom. Fall semester adult basic education classes for the new cohort are held virtually on Zoom, with four-hour daily time limits. Teachers are available by Zoom for individual student discussions, and we use Google Classrooms as online portals for families to easily access class assignments and materials, and to cultivate a classroom community. We also deliver packages of hard copy materials and relevant handouts for parents and children to work on at home. We have adapted our after exit services virtually to meet the needs of alumni families during social distancing. Our priority is the safety and stability of our families.


Grant Application
Saranam, LLC
Fall 2020 Grant Cycle
Saranam
$1,087,325.00
$15,000.00
1.40%
Capacity Building
Dec. 1st, 2020
Sep. 30th, 2021
Requested funds support on-call IT support for our organization and all families to access programming, as well as rehabilitating the Family Center backyard to accommodate small group meetings.
Saranam, a transitional living program for homeless families, has continued to remain operational during the COVID-19 crisis to provide families in our transitional living program with a safe home, household/cleaning supplies, adequate food supplies, case management, and educational opportunities. In August we welcomed 10 new families into the program despite the financial challenges we encountered from having fundraising interrupted. Saranam families are especially vulnerable during the pandemic, and Saranam ensures their needs are met. Saranam has adapted programming and developed virtual solutions to connect and support our families during COVID-19. We provide case management several times weekly via phone or Zoom to provide encouragement and support to families, and hold life skills classes, children’s activities, and community meetings virtually via Zoom. Fall semester adult basic education classes for the new cohort are held virtually on Zoom, with four-hour daily time limits. Teachers are available by Zoom for individual student discussions, and we use Google Classrooms as online portals for families to easily access class assignments and materials, and to cultivate a classroom community. We also deliver packages of hard copy materials and relevant handouts for parents and children to work on at home. We have adapted our after exit services virtually to meet the needs of alumni families during social distancing. Our priority is the safety and stability of our families.
Saranam requests $15,000 to support efforts to adjust programming to COVID-19 constraints. Efforts include upgrading technology and rehabilitating our Family Center’s backyard to accommodate socially distanced outdoor small group meetings. Saranam has had to shift all our programming—case management, adult basic education, life skills classes, after exit services, and children’s programming—to an online format using mainly Zoom, and this shift requires more intensive technology support. We have had to upgrade our technological capacity for both the organization and individual families to use in their apartment units, such as computers with webcams. To ensure our families have the capacity to consistently engage online, which is essential, we have had to contract with an on-call IT company to provide troubleshooting support. Funding would support costs affiliated with this contract. In addition, to rehabilitate the Family Center backyard requires leveling the ground, building a retaining wall, laying sod or xeriscaping the grounds, and purchasing outdoor furniture. The initial bid for this project was $26,550, and we are soliciting additional bids. Having the capacity for outdoor small group meetings is important to our service model, in which community is an essential element. How do you build community while social distancing, especially with the new families who only entered our program in August? Creating an outdoor meeting space is one solution to this challenge.
Will apply $1,000 toward the total care cost over ten months.
10
Bernalillo County Imagination Library book delivery

Libros for Kids is an affiliate of The Dollywood Foundation’s Imagination Library that delivers free, age appropriate, books to children’s homes that are age 0-5, targeting underserved communities.


Funds from this grant will only be used to purchase books for children age 0-5 for direct delivery to the child’s home in Bernalillo County. Just think what a thrill it is for pre-school children to receive their very own book once a month. Fostering a family dynamic of reading, parents interacting with their children and storytelling, strengthens the parent child bond and directly enhances early literacy that will foster the child's success throughout their lifelong learning process. Libros differs from other Imagination Library partners because we actively seek collaborations and build relationships to improve literacy of all ages. We now have more than 40 community collaborators that help identify families with young children for enrollment. Due to the restrictions as a result of the pandemic we have opened our web site to allow families to enroll their children through the internet. We have opened enrollment for all of Bernalillo County, but spend our efforts working and developing community partners in the most underserved area of the county, the south valley and the International district. Our community partnerships include pediatric clinics, local post offices, speech therapy programs, Presbyterian and UNM hospitals, YDI programs, PB&J, city libraries, New Futures High School and churches. Libros has found our most aggressive partnerships to be at food banks where the parents have a hunger to improve literacy for their children.


Grant Application
Libros for Kids, Inc.
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Bernalillo County Imagination Library book delivery
$75,000.00
$15,000.00
20.00%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Dec. 31st, 2021
Libros for Kids is an affiliate of The Dollywood Foundation’s Imagination Library that delivers free, age appropriate, books to children’s homes that are age 0-5, targeting underserved communities.
Funds from this grant will only be used to purchase books for children age 0-5 for direct delivery to the child’s home in Bernalillo County. Just think what a thrill it is for pre-school children to receive their very own book once a month. Fostering a family dynamic of reading, parents interacting with their children and storytelling, strengthens the parent child bond and directly enhances early literacy that will foster the child's success throughout their lifelong learning process. Libros differs from other Imagination Library partners because we actively seek collaborations and build relationships to improve literacy of all ages. We now have more than 40 community collaborators that help identify families with young children for enrollment. Due to the restrictions as a result of the pandemic we have opened our web site to allow families to enroll their children through the internet. We have opened enrollment for all of Bernalillo County, but spend our efforts working and developing community partners in the most underserved area of the county, the south valley and the International district. Our community partnerships include pediatric clinics, local post offices, speech therapy programs, Presbyterian and UNM hospitals, YDI programs, PB&J, city libraries, New Futures High School and churches. Libros has found our most aggressive partnerships to be at food banks where the parents have a hunger to improve literacy for their children.
At the start of 2020, our goal was to have 3000 children enrolled in our program by the end of the year. At a cost of approximately $25 per child, per year, we needed to have $75,000 budgeted to pay for the books. So far this year we have raised $46,000. Our current enrollment is 2300 children, growing every month by about 200. Historically our operational costs have been kept to a minimum (13%), all of our staff are volunteers. All of the funds requested from your foundation would go into Program Support, for the cost of books and mailing. A grant of $15,000 would support 600 children receiving books for one year.
Our primary tracking metric is the number of children to receive books.
600
Former Guest Employment Program

The Interfaith Community Shelter at Pete's Place likes to put our money where our mouth is -- specifically, we do our best to employ formerly homeless Shelter guests.


Currently, ICS employs 6 people who first entered our doors from the streets seeking emergency shelter services. Through intensive case management and assistance from numerous partner providers who work with our clients, they have managed to stablilize their lives in permanent housing and through employment at the Shelter. Many of the former guests we employ continue to need more support and skills training than most employers would be able to offer, which is what makes this a bit of a program within a program. Because our supervisors and executive director are accustomed to relating to individuals who are battling mental and behavioral health issues, the Shelter is a perfect place to begin the process of training people to perform the basic skills necessary to be sucessfully employed in the workforce. Because the Shelter is an essential service to the community, our former guests have been blessed with job security even during the pandemic, although we have seen a marked increase in need in the community for Shelter services.


Grant Application
Interfaith Community Shelter Group, Inc.
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Former Guest Employment Program
$972,035.00
$15,000.00
1.54%
General Operations
Dec. 7th, 2020
Jan. 8th, 2021
The Interfaith Community Shelter at Pete's Place likes to put our money where our mouth is -- specifically, we do our best to employ formerly homeless Shelter guests.
Currently, ICS employs 6 people who first entered our doors from the streets seeking emergency shelter services. Through intensive case management and assistance from numerous partner providers who work with our clients, they have managed to stablilize their lives in permanent housing and through employment at the Shelter. Many of the former guests we employ continue to need more support and skills training than most employers would be able to offer, which is what makes this a bit of a program within a program. Because our supervisors and executive director are accustomed to relating to individuals who are battling mental and behavioral health issues, the Shelter is a perfect place to begin the process of training people to perform the basic skills necessary to be sucessfully employed in the workforce. Because the Shelter is an essential service to the community, our former guests have been blessed with job security even during the pandemic, although we have seen a marked increase in need in the community for Shelter services.
Shelter Total Annual Budget: $972,035 Amount Devoted to Former Guest Employment: $95,000 Based on the Shelter's 2019-2020 audit, ICS is proud again this year that the bulk of our spending goes directly to the people we serve. The Shelter is ever‐thankful for a model that includes organized financial controls, a dedicated, hard‐working staff and an amazing, committed group of volunteers who donate their time, expertise, meals and clothing. Ultimately, all of these factors contribute to the Shelter’s ability to keep administrative costs at 8.9%.
Number of bed nights provided for the overnight shelter. Due to Covid-19, our goal is significantly lower than in normal years, due to our having to limit the number of people in the dormitories. But we are also housing 40 people in a local motel.
15,000
Sand: From Pig-Pen in Peanuts to Healthy Horses and Humans

Requesting sand for our horse-riding arena. We need a 3 inch top-layer of sand to provide safe, soft, and secure footing for the horses and humans who participate in this component of the program.


Wilderwood’s horse-riding arena is integral to delivery of its program: the first equine-assisted curriculum designed by autistics for autistics. The Problem: Animal and human welfare is paramount in our program. We have, however, quite possibly the worst type of ground for an arena: silty, fine clay soil. When it is wet, it is muddy, boggy, and extremely slippery; when dry, the silty fine particles create a dusty haze (like “Pig-Pen” in Peanuts), resulting in respiratory and visual hazards for horses and humans alike. The Solution: We have done our research to solve this problem, and in the process received a range of quotes including one for $118,000 (special vulcanized rubber footing, apparently). In the end, we identified a perfectly satisfactory – and more cost effective – solution with a layer of basecourse (to prevent the sand being sucked down into the ground and aquifer) followed by a 3 inch top-layer of sand. We have secured the basecourse, volunteer hours to groom and lay the sand, and are now requesting a grant for the sand itself. Once the project is complete, the arena will have a safe, cushioned, and secure footing that will ensure the health and safety of the horses, participants, instructors, and volunteers – both in the coming year and long after the term of the grant.


Grant Application
Wilderwood Equine Therapy and Rescue
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Sand: From Pig-Pen in Peanuts to Healthy Horses and Humans
$185,000.00
$4,545.60
2.46%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Dec. 31st, 2021
Requesting sand for our horse-riding arena. We need a 3 inch top-layer of sand to provide safe, soft, and secure footing for the horses and humans who participate in this component of the program.
Wilderwood’s horse-riding arena is integral to delivery of its program: the first equine-assisted curriculum designed by autistics for autistics. The Problem: Animal and human welfare is paramount in our program. We have, however, quite possibly the worst type of ground for an arena: silty, fine clay soil. When it is wet, it is muddy, boggy, and extremely slippery; when dry, the silty fine particles create a dusty haze (like “Pig-Pen” in Peanuts), resulting in respiratory and visual hazards for horses and humans alike. The Solution: We have done our research to solve this problem, and in the process received a range of quotes including one for $118,000 (special vulcanized rubber footing, apparently). In the end, we identified a perfectly satisfactory – and more cost effective – solution with a layer of basecourse (to prevent the sand being sucked down into the ground and aquifer) followed by a 3 inch top-layer of sand. We have secured the basecourse, volunteer hours to groom and lay the sand, and are now requesting a grant for the sand itself. Once the project is complete, the arena will have a safe, cushioned, and secure footing that will ensure the health and safety of the horses, participants, instructors, and volunteers – both in the coming year and long after the term of the grant.
Sand: 3 inch depth for 60m x 20m riding arena used for equine-facilitated curriculum 120 cubic yards x $37.88/cubic yard delivered = $4,545.60 Sand grooming/laying: Volunteer hours Total Budget: $4,545.60
30 (26 humans / 4 horses) 9 participants, 2 instructors, 15 volunteers, and 4 horses will directly benefit from this project in the year of completion with many more to benefit in the following years. The top-layer of sand will complete the project.
30
Empowerment For Self Sufficiency

TLCC is a small, focused program that seeks to do one thing well: inspire and empower homeless and low-income individuals to become financially self-supporting through job and life skills training.


TenderLove Community Center (TLCC) is one of those non-profits on the front lines, uniquely focused on helping individuals break the cycles of poverty that have led to homelessness, but addressing their specific needs for healthcare, education, legal assistance, and life- and job-skills training. While temporary shelter, meals and clothing are all essential to marginalized and homeless people, we give individuals the support they need to overcome homelessness, rather than continuing to count them as ‘served,’ without counting their situation as ‘solved.’ Our founder experienced homelessness herself and recognized the need for a program that does more than simply provide short term solutions, assisting individuals to rise above their traumatic experiences and build self-sufficiency. TLCC offers a free year-long training and mentoring program, teaching homeless and near-homeless individuals marketable life skills using sewing and fashion design as the platform. This is the kind of sustained support and mentoring needed to help homeless people escape from the cycle of poverty. During this unprecedented time of COVID -19, our services remain uninterrupted both at our Recovery / Transitional Housing and Job Training programs. Our goal is to house homeless people for up to six months, help them find a job and assist in moving them to their permanent housing with thorough case management and encouragement for job retention.


Grant Application
TenderLove Community Center (TLCC)
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Empowerment For Self Sufficiency
$378,100.00
$15,000.00
3.97%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Dec. 31st, 2021
TLCC is a small, focused program that seeks to do one thing well: inspire and empower homeless and low-income individuals to become financially self-supporting through job and life skills training.
TenderLove Community Center (TLCC) is one of those non-profits on the front lines, uniquely focused on helping individuals break the cycles of poverty that have led to homelessness, but addressing their specific needs for healthcare, education, legal assistance, and life- and job-skills training. While temporary shelter, meals and clothing are all essential to marginalized and homeless people, we give individuals the support they need to overcome homelessness, rather than continuing to count them as ‘served,’ without counting their situation as ‘solved.’ Our founder experienced homelessness herself and recognized the need for a program that does more than simply provide short term solutions, assisting individuals to rise above their traumatic experiences and build self-sufficiency. TLCC offers a free year-long training and mentoring program, teaching homeless and near-homeless individuals marketable life skills using sewing and fashion design as the platform. This is the kind of sustained support and mentoring needed to help homeless people escape from the cycle of poverty. During this unprecedented time of COVID -19, our services remain uninterrupted both at our Recovery / Transitional Housing and Job Training programs. Our goal is to house homeless people for up to six months, help them find a job and assist in moving them to their permanent housing with thorough case management and encouragement for job retention.
TenderLove Community Center is requesting general operating funds to keep our program going amidst and post this unprecedented time of pandemic. We currently have 6 part time staff, three of them are TLCC alumnae while the remaining three are TLCC former volunteers with full understanding of our mission. This proposal if approved, will help us with client Virtual Intake / New Clients kits, Case Management, food, and cleaning supplies together with clients’ permanent housing application fees to benefit 15 homeless individuals while building long term virtual case management to measure client’s achievements after exiting our program for job and housing retention using World Health Organization Quality of Life survey and Goal Attainment Scale at a budget of $1000 per client per 15 clients…. Thank you!
At a tuition cost of $1,000, the $9,000 grant will support the tuition of 9 individuals to participate in your Sewing Life Skills Program.
9
Storehouse New Mexico Basic Needs and Human Welfare

A $12,000 grant from the FHL Foundation will allow Storehouse to distribute 60,000 meals to 1,875 individuals and families facing hunger in Central New Mexico.


During these uncertain times, it is no surprise that we are seeing dozens of new faces at the Storehouse. The unemployment rate in New Mexico in November ’20 hovered at 7.5% just slightly down from the previous month but higher than the national average at 6.7%. The massive unemployment rates are impacting a state already threatened by food insecurity. Just last year, Feeding America reported that 25% of children in our state face food insecurity. 1 in 4 children in our community don’t know where their next meal is coming from. Adults and seniors reflect increasingly similar statistics. For years, Storehouse has taken great pride in our Client Choice Model. The model invited clients to grab a cart at our warehouse and choose the foods they want, allowing for less food waste and increased client dignity. Currently, the model is not compliant with COVID-19 health guidelines, so Storehouse has adapted its operations so clients, staff, and volunteers remain safe. The staff now sort, package, and distribute food boxes to our clients. Each box contains fruits and vegetables, along with non-perishable food items. Providing clients with healthy foods is a standard practice at the Storehouse. Despite the impact of COVID-19 Storehouse will continue to serve over 50,000 individuals this year, including our most vulnerable populations: poor and working poor individuals, children, families, seniors, veterans, the homeless, people with disabilities, and the growing unemployed population.


Grant Application
Storehouse New Mexico
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Storehouse New Mexico Basic Needs and Human Welfare
$582,064.00
$12,000.00
2.06%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Dec. 31st, 2021
A $12,000 grant from the FHL Foundation will allow Storehouse to distribute 60,000 meals to 1,875 individuals and families facing hunger in Central New Mexico.
During these uncertain times, it is no surprise that we are seeing dozens of new faces at the Storehouse. The unemployment rate in New Mexico in November ’20 hovered at 7.5% just slightly down from the previous month but higher than the national average at 6.7%. The massive unemployment rates are impacting a state already threatened by food insecurity. Just last year, Feeding America reported that 25% of children in our state face food insecurity. 1 in 4 children in our community don’t know where their next meal is coming from. Adults and seniors reflect increasingly similar statistics. For years, Storehouse has taken great pride in our Client Choice Model. The model invited clients to grab a cart at our warehouse and choose the foods they want, allowing for less food waste and increased client dignity. Currently, the model is not compliant with COVID-19 health guidelines, so Storehouse has adapted its operations so clients, staff, and volunteers remain safe. The staff now sort, package, and distribute food boxes to our clients. Each box contains fruits and vegetables, along with non-perishable food items. Providing clients with healthy foods is a standard practice at the Storehouse. Despite the impact of COVID-19 Storehouse will continue to serve over 50,000 individuals this year, including our most vulnerable populations: poor and working poor individuals, children, families, seniors, veterans, the homeless, people with disabilities, and the growing unemployed population.
Storehouse New Mexico is grateful for the generous funding granted from the FHL Foundation in January of 2019. This year, we have increased our requested amount because of the unanticipated expenses Storehouse has faced as a result of COVID-19. To continue operations under COVID-19 health compliances, Storehouse has purchased sanitizing items (wipes, cleaners, thermometers, PPE), plexi glass shields, and cardboard boxes (for food distribution) to keep our staff members and volunteers safe as they work to distribute food to clients. Storehouse clients wait outside of the warehouse while a food box is prepared and brought to them, to minimize contact for everyone’s safety. With a large crowd waiting outside, Storehouse has engaged the services of a security company to ensure everyone acts orderly and remains safe while waiting for their food boxes. These unexpected expenditures have cost the Storehouse $13,966 since the outbreak of COVID-19. A $12,000 grant from the FHL Foundation would be spent as follows: $7,500 or 62.5% would be spent strictly on food distribution. Food distribution includes COVID-19 related expenses, and the cost of preparing and distributing nutritious food boxes. 25%, or $3,000 would be spent on staff salary expenses, and $1,500, or 12.5% would be allocated toward utility expenses. Despite the impact of COVID-19, Storehouse is grateful to adapt and continues to serve the community.
At a cost of $30 to prepare a food box, the tracking parameter will be the number of individuals or families to receive food boxes.
830
Barret House Emergency Housing

With a holistic approach to ending homelessness, providing shelter includes meals, hygiene products, case management, and support with the sole purpose of helping women transition into stable housing


Ranking highest among states in poverty, many of the women and children we serve are in our shelter because of impoverishment. Through our work at Barrett Foundation, we have learned the face of homelessness is changing and often surprising. Many of the women we serve are single mothers who are underemployed or unemployed. We often have educated women—including RN's and graduate degree holders—who find themselves suffering from a precarious job market coupled with unaffordable housing options. Barrett helps address the issue of homelessness for the women and children we serve by providing case management and supportive services to ensure that homelessness for this vulnerable population is short-lived and non-recurring. Each woman at Barrett works with a housing stability advocate to transition into permanent housing. Our wide range of programs and systems help improve employ-ability and other attributes that will lead to improved economic mobility for the women and their children. Our services don't end when women leave to move into permanent housing. Case managers continue to follow up with clients through home visits for two years to ensure that becoming contributing members of our community is achieved. We believe our approach has been so successful for 35 years because we understand when women have the tools necessary to end the cycle of homelessness, they become stakeholders, are more apt to get involved, and contribute to the schools and community in which they live.


Grant Application
Barrett Foundation, Inc
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
Barret House Emergency Housing
$816,848.00
$25,000.00
3.06%
General Operations
Dec. 7th, 2020
Jan. 8th, 2021
With a holistic approach to ending homelessness, providing shelter includes meals, hygiene products, case management, and support with the sole purpose of helping women transition into stable housing
Ranking highest among states in poverty, many of the women and children we serve are in our shelter because of impoverishment. Through our work at Barrett Foundation, we have learned the face of homelessness is changing and often surprising. Many of the women we serve are single mothers who are underemployed or unemployed. We often have educated women—including RN's and graduate degree holders—who find themselves suffering from a precarious job market coupled with unaffordable housing options. Barrett helps address the issue of homelessness for the women and children we serve by providing case management and supportive services to ensure that homelessness for this vulnerable population is short-lived and non-recurring. Each woman at Barrett works with a housing stability advocate to transition into permanent housing. Our wide range of programs and systems help improve employ-ability and other attributes that will lead to improved economic mobility for the women and their children. Our services don't end when women leave to move into permanent housing. Case managers continue to follow up with clients through home visits for two years to ensure that becoming contributing members of our community is achieved. We believe our approach has been so successful for 35 years because we understand when women have the tools necessary to end the cycle of homelessness, they become stakeholders, are more apt to get involved, and contribute to the schools and community in which they live.
Funding from FHL will be used to offset expenses related to operating and programmatic support of the shelter and its residents.
We use the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) as required as a recipient of HUD funding to track the women and children served. Outcomes, including transition rates, are tracked in HMIS and internally.
150
House Rabbit RHDV2 Vaccination Project

To provide life-saving vaccine to protect House Rabbits in our shelter and adoption homes from the deadly Rabbit Hemorrhagic Virus 2 (RHDV2).


In the spring of 2020, Covid-19 shut down our shelter for 3 months during our Governor's Stay at Home Order, and all of our shelter bunnies went into foster care homes with our Volunteers. At that same time, Colorado had it's first reported case of a similar novel virus attacking bunnies - Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2. Now that our shelter is reopen and serving our community, we are battling this deadly virus that is extremely contagious among bunnies and is nearly 100% fatal. If one bunny in our shelter contracts the virus, our entire population will have to be euthanized per our governing agency. Thankfully there is a vaccine which we, through our partnering Veterinarian, import from England to administer to all incoming shelter bunnies. The bunnies must then be microchipped to record and track their vaccination, and they must be vaccinated every year. Bunnies can live to be 15 years old, so the expense adds up. The vaccine is 90% effective. Cases have been reported in Washington, New York City, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, California and Utah. We are committed to providing education and vaccine to all our incoming shelter bunnies who travel from neighboring states also fighting this virus, and provide vaccine access to our previously adopted bunnies, as well as special adoption cases for lower-income adopters to afford medical care for their bunns. This year we vaccinated over 180 bunnies. We expect that number to grow to over 200 in 2021.


Grant Application
Colorado House Rabbit Society
Winter 2021 Grant Cycle
House Rabbit RHDV2 Vaccination Project
$35,200.00
$10,000.00
28.41%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Dec. 31st, 2021
To provide life-saving vaccine to protect House Rabbits in our shelter and adoption homes from the deadly Rabbit Hemorrhagic Virus 2 (RHDV2).
In the spring of 2020, Covid-19 shut down our shelter for 3 months during our Governor's Stay at Home Order, and all of our shelter bunnies went into foster care homes with our Volunteers. At that same time, Colorado had it's first reported case of a similar novel virus attacking bunnies - Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2. Now that our shelter is reopen and serving our community, we are battling this deadly virus that is extremely contagious among bunnies and is nearly 100% fatal. If one bunny in our shelter contracts the virus, our entire population will have to be euthanized per our governing agency. Thankfully there is a vaccine which we, through our partnering Veterinarian, import from England to administer to all incoming shelter bunnies. The bunnies must then be microchipped to record and track their vaccination, and they must be vaccinated every year. Bunnies can live to be 15 years old, so the expense adds up. The vaccine is 90% effective. Cases have been reported in Washington, New York City, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, California and Utah. We are committed to providing education and vaccine to all our incoming shelter bunnies who travel from neighboring states also fighting this virus, and provide vaccine access to our previously adopted bunnies, as well as special adoption cases for lower-income adopters to afford medical care for their bunns. This year we vaccinated over 180 bunnies. We expect that number to grow to over 200 in 2021.
Vaccine costs include a Veterinarian exam, microchip and injection. The rate for this is $176 per bunny. Our projection for 2021 is 200 incoming bunnies (although recent increased adoption numbers due to our new management, a rise in Covid-19 related adoptions, enhanced community outreach and expanded adoption processes could easily increase that by 20% or more) Estimating 200 adoptions @ $176 per bunny = 35,200
Our success is tracked based entirely on the number of bunnies we can serve and vaccines we can afford. We cannot intake a bunny unless they are vaccinated. (I don't know how to assign a Tracking Metric Goal number below). =)
50
Virtual Field Trips & Grab and Go Kits for NM Teachers, Children, and Families

SFCM requests a grant of $10,000 to support virtual learning, and hands-on activities for teachers, children, and families to inspire excellence and life-long learning throughout the State of NM.


Funding will support Virtual Field Trips to public schools along with distributing hands-on Grab and Go Kits, to children, teachers and, families throughout NM. Within weeks of school closure in March 2020, we launched Virtual Field Trips and have proudly served 6,000 children and teachers so far. Teachers can book live, interactive bilingual learning experiences structured around the State of NM's core standards. The curriculum incorporates images taken from space, artistic renderings, new vocabulary, and links to resources to extend learning. The program has served Southside Santa Fe, Pojoaque, Espanola, Santo Domingo Pueblo, Albuquerque, Santa Cruz, Las Vegas, Ribera, Ohkay Owingeh (Rio Arriba County-Federally Recognized Tribe), Chama, Rio Rancho, Pecos, Tohatchi and, Las Cruces. During this time of closure, remote, and hybrid learning, many kids will inevitably miss out on the breadth and depth of education. This is especially paramount for children without access to the internet. To address this, we have developed themed kits (Garden, STEM, Astronomy) which include bilingual lessons, instructions, and materials to be distributed to rural and underserved tribal, and pueblos across NM. Working with distribution partners such as Keres Children's Learning Center in Cochiti Pueblo, Rio Arriba County Health Department, NM State Tribal Libraries, and others, we have distributed 5,000 kits. This grant will help to extend the distribution of more kits to families in need.


Grant Application
SANTA FE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Virtual Field Trips & Grab and Go Kits for NM Teachers, Children, and Families
$222,460.00
$10,000.00
4.50%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
SFCM requests a grant of $10,000 to support virtual learning, and hands-on activities for teachers, children, and families to inspire excellence and life-long learning throughout the State of NM.
Funding will support Virtual Field Trips to public schools along with distributing hands-on Grab and Go Kits, to children, teachers and, families throughout NM. Within weeks of school closure in March 2020, we launched Virtual Field Trips and have proudly served 6,000 children and teachers so far. Teachers can book live, interactive bilingual learning experiences structured around the State of NM's core standards. The curriculum incorporates images taken from space, artistic renderings, new vocabulary, and links to resources to extend learning. The program has served Southside Santa Fe, Pojoaque, Espanola, Santo Domingo Pueblo, Albuquerque, Santa Cruz, Las Vegas, Ribera, Ohkay Owingeh (Rio Arriba County-Federally Recognized Tribe), Chama, Rio Rancho, Pecos, Tohatchi and, Las Cruces. During this time of closure, remote, and hybrid learning, many kids will inevitably miss out on the breadth and depth of education. This is especially paramount for children without access to the internet. To address this, we have developed themed kits (Garden, STEM, Astronomy) which include bilingual lessons, instructions, and materials to be distributed to rural and underserved tribal, and pueblos across NM. Working with distribution partners such as Keres Children's Learning Center in Cochiti Pueblo, Rio Arriba County Health Department, NM State Tribal Libraries, and others, we have distributed 5,000 kits. This grant will help to extend the distribution of more kits to families in need.
The Museum has made significant changes to our budget as a result of COVID. Budget adaptations included laying off of 9 staff members, requesting rent abatement from the State, reducing all non-essential expenses, and seeking ways to generate earned income, such as holding camps. The $10,000 from FHL Foundation will provide critical operational support, specifically helping: Cover 1,000 Grab and Go Kits per $5,000 Fund Virtual Field Trips at $1255/week Help to cover $107,411 of Administrative salaries/year Help to cover $108,000 of Misc Operating Expenses-Rent, Utilities, Maintenance, etc/year
The Kit (with all of the components discussed, salary, materials, etc.) would be $8.19 per kit. For $10,000 we could create 1,221 kits to be distributed across New Mexico.
1,221
Just Imagine!

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library continues to grow in New Mexico. “Just Imagine!” provides training and support to local affiliates who want to give children 0-4 the gifts of book ownership.


Since 2010 we’ve delivered 136,621 books to 80% of babies, toddlers and preschoolers in Grant County. Research and parent surveys confirm that children benefit by becoming more interested in books, learning new vocabulary, spending more time with family members and scoring higher on reading proficiency tests. That’s why we’ve grown the Imagination Library in New Mexico through our state expansion project, “Just Imagine!” With support from the FHL Foundation, we’ve advocated for partial state funding and offered new affiliates 501c3 sponsorship, sample books, registration forms, displays, training and start-up funding. Our founders, Barbara and Loren Nelson, have become Emeritus Board Members and continue to champion the Imagination Library’s state expansion efforts. Since 2015, we have grown the number of affiliates in the state to 41. In the past year, during the pandemic, we supported 8 new affiliates in Roosevelt, DeBaca, San Miguel, Mora, Guadalupe, Union, Valencia, McKinley and Chaves counties. All 33 counties now have at least one affiliate, and today 17,739 children are enrolled and receive a free book in the mail every month. With this grant we will help affiliates expand their coverage areas and enroll more children.


Grant Application
Imagination Library of Grant County Inc
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Just Imagine!
$58,040.00
$7,500.00
12.92%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library continues to grow in New Mexico. “Just Imagine!” provides training and support to local affiliates who want to give children 0-4 the gifts of book ownership.
Since 2010 we’ve delivered 136,621 books to 80% of babies, toddlers and preschoolers in Grant County. Research and parent surveys confirm that children benefit by becoming more interested in books, learning new vocabulary, spending more time with family members and scoring higher on reading proficiency tests. That’s why we’ve grown the Imagination Library in New Mexico through our state expansion project, “Just Imagine!” With support from the FHL Foundation, we’ve advocated for partial state funding and offered new affiliates 501c3 sponsorship, sample books, registration forms, displays, training and start-up funding. Our founders, Barbara and Loren Nelson, have become Emeritus Board Members and continue to champion the Imagination Library’s state expansion efforts. Since 2015, we have grown the number of affiliates in the state to 41. In the past year, during the pandemic, we supported 8 new affiliates in Roosevelt, DeBaca, San Miguel, Mora, Guadalupe, Union, Valencia, McKinley and Chaves counties. All 33 counties now have at least one affiliate, and today 17,739 children are enrolled and receive a free book in the mail every month. With this grant we will help affiliates expand their coverage areas and enroll more children.
Our organization's total budget is $110,190 which includes a local program budget of $52,150 and a state program budget of $58,040. If awarded, we propose to spend the FHL grant in at least 3 of 5 areas related to state expansion: Books, Payroll, Research, Educational Materials and Travel. We will not use the FHL Foundation's grant for more than 50% of costs in any expense category. Although the State of New Mexico's Early Literacy grant reimburses affiliates up to 50% of book costs, the appropriated $100,000 is no longer adequate. In the current grant cycle, only a portion of affiliates requested reimbursement, and those requests exceeded the amount available by about $75,000. FHL funds will help us offset costs for new and struggling affiliates.
We propose to grow Imagination Library enrollment in New Mexico to at least 20,000 children.
20,000
Explora's Statewide Outreach Program

Explora’s Statewide Outreach program will provide COVID-safe, experiential STEM engagement for 1,500 underserved students in tribal, rural, and remote communities throughout New Mexico.


Over the past year, Explora transformed our Statewide Outreach program to meet the challenges of remote- and hybrid engagement necessitated by COVID-19. Your support in 2020 enabled Explora to provide 1,278 individuals with quality STEM enrichment despite our closure, significant budgetary & staff reductions, and the shuttering of many of our partners. Having maintained deep ties with partners in underserved communities and developed the capacity to provide COVID-safe yet hands-on STEM, Explora’s Statewide Outreach program is well-positioned to support students during the pandemic and beyond. This year, we will engage 1,500 students via virtual (& in-person, when possible) STEM programs and materials-rich STEM Learning Kits. The many crises in 2020 have shown that equitable access to education and economic opportunity is more important than ever. Today, low-income and students of color are most at risk of learning loss due to lack of access to “high-quality remote learning, devices they do not need to share, [&] high-speed internet.” (McKinsey & Company, 2020). Without intervention, these students risk falling between three months to a year behind (NM Legislative Finance Committee, 2020). Explora respectfully requests FHL’s continued support to meet these needs with free, experiential STEM education that scaffolds school-time learning, addresses the digital divide, and reduces learning loss for students underrepresented in STEM.


Grant Application
Explora Science Center & Childrens Museum of Albuquerque
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Explora's Statewide Outreach Program
$60,000.00
$20,000.00
33.33%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Explora’s Statewide Outreach program will provide COVID-safe, experiential STEM engagement for 1,500 underserved students in tribal, rural, and remote communities throughout New Mexico.
Over the past year, Explora transformed our Statewide Outreach program to meet the challenges of remote- and hybrid engagement necessitated by COVID-19. Your support in 2020 enabled Explora to provide 1,278 individuals with quality STEM enrichment despite our closure, significant budgetary & staff reductions, and the shuttering of many of our partners. Having maintained deep ties with partners in underserved communities and developed the capacity to provide COVID-safe yet hands-on STEM, Explora’s Statewide Outreach program is well-positioned to support students during the pandemic and beyond. This year, we will engage 1,500 students via virtual (& in-person, when possible) STEM programs and materials-rich STEM Learning Kits. The many crises in 2020 have shown that equitable access to education and economic opportunity is more important than ever. Today, low-income and students of color are most at risk of learning loss due to lack of access to “high-quality remote learning, devices they do not need to share, [&] high-speed internet.” (McKinsey & Company, 2020). Without intervention, these students risk falling between three months to a year behind (NM Legislative Finance Committee, 2020). Explora respectfully requests FHL’s continued support to meet these needs with free, experiential STEM education that scaffolds school-time learning, addresses the digital divide, and reduces learning loss for students underrepresented in STEM.
As COVID-19 magnifies the digital divide and widens the opportunity gap for marginalized children, Explora is aggressively promoting educational equity by targeting students living in underserved communities. Together with FHL Foundation, Explora will eliminate transportation, financial, and language barriers for children across the state by providing a blend of digital and non-digital, multilingual, low- to no-cost STEM engagement. Our budget fully reflects these priorities, as follows: The bulk of funds, $12,000, will defray staff costs, which include curriculum development, planning, scheduling, and program facilitation. A total of $6,000 in materials has been allocated to create STEM Learning Kits for distribution to student participants. Not all programs will be supported by Kits, as some utilize materials easily found at home in an effort to democratize science and show families that they can engage in STEM learning without fancy materials or expensive equipment. $1,000 has been allocated in printing and translation costs for STEM activity cards included in Kits. In the past, Explora has utilized activity cards in Spanish, Diné (Navajo), Chinese, Vietnamese, Farsi, and Braille. Lastly, $1,000 has been budgeted for shipping costs to mail Kits to partner locations throughout the state.
The STEM Learning Kit cost is $40/each including materials, mailing, staff time and program delivery. The requested $20,000 will allow us to create and deliver 400 STEM Learning Kits to children throughout New Mexico.
400
Science of Weather in Virtual Classrooms

Teachers from K to 12 will be offered an online class on weather. Through shorter lectures, outdoor activities and interactive discussions the students will feel like real active participants.


Online schooling has been a very challenging change for many. Teachers and students are equally struggling due to the new format and expectations. Teachers feel they need to do triple the work; students feel frustrated as they often don’t understand what their task is. The end result is the loss of valuable time and knowledge, and it is hard to predict when it will change. This project aims to address and improve online schooling. The class Science of Weather will be offered to teachers who are doing their Master’s program at NMT. This class will be re-developed to satisfy the new form of online teaching. Shorter, crisper lectures will be followed by interactive online discussions. For example, the students will have an opportunity to read articles on climate change from professional journals, popular journals and from media. Through the virtual discussion among themselves and a teacher (myself) they will understand what is scientific language and how media sometimes doesn’t get it right. They will get to offer their own solutions and think how to create similar discussions in their classrooms. The assignments will be focused on outdoor, for example: taking pictures and identifying clouds. Through this class the students who are teachers themselves will learn how to do proper online schooling, how to set up clear lectures, assignments and goals. With the newly gained perspective of being an online student themselves, they will learn how to teach in their virtual classrooms.


Grant Application
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Science of Weather in Virtual Classrooms
$20,000.00
$5,000.00
25.00%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Teachers from K to 12 will be offered an online class on weather. Through shorter lectures, outdoor activities and interactive discussions the students will feel like real active participants.
Online schooling has been a very challenging change for many. Teachers and students are equally struggling due to the new format and expectations. Teachers feel they need to do triple the work; students feel frustrated as they often don’t understand what their task is. The end result is the loss of valuable time and knowledge, and it is hard to predict when it will change. This project aims to address and improve online schooling. The class Science of Weather will be offered to teachers who are doing their Master’s program at NMT. This class will be re-developed to satisfy the new form of online teaching. Shorter, crisper lectures will be followed by interactive online discussions. For example, the students will have an opportunity to read articles on climate change from professional journals, popular journals and from media. Through the virtual discussion among themselves and a teacher (myself) they will understand what is scientific language and how media sometimes doesn’t get it right. They will get to offer their own solutions and think how to create similar discussions in their classrooms. The assignments will be focused on outdoor, for example: taking pictures and identifying clouds. Through this class the students who are teachers themselves will learn how to do proper online schooling, how to set up clear lectures, assignments and goals. With the newly gained perspective of being an online student themselves, they will learn how to teach in their virtual classrooms.
$ 4000 are requested to cover class tuition for 8 students. $ 1000 dollars is requested for the student worker to help with technical aspects of the class. The cost of class development and time of a lecturer (myself) is covered by New Mexico Tech ($6000). Platform for the class as well as its maintenance is covered by NMT ($ 4000). Matching $ 5000 for following 3 years is obtained from National Science Foundation (NSF) as a part of their outreach program. This project is long term and only needs a bit of help to get started. Funds requested: $ 4000 for student tuition for the first year, $ 1000 for student worker, total: $ 5000. Fuds provided by NMT: $ 6000 development of the class, $ 4000 technical support, $ 5000 from NSF for the following 3 years. Total: $ 15 000.
Number of students that successfully complete the course (15). Number of their students that benefit from that - longer term goal. At the end of first year virtual mini conference will offer students to share their experiences.
15
Support Two Students in the FS-NM After-School Program for 2021-22

Grant funding will allow two students to participate in the FSNM after school program which combines rigorous academic tutoring, life skills instruction, and intensive tennis training.


FSNM is a microcosm of the student population of the US, exhibiting the myriad of developmental, socio-emotional, and home-life problems that plague children across the country. Santa Fe exhibits some of the lowest school outcomes in the nation, combined with indicators of poor physical and emotional health such as obesity, diabetes, substance abuse and suicide. In the 2017 Santa Fe Youth Summit Report, youth indicated that there is a lack of physical education in schools, and that this has contributed to poor physical and mental health. The 2019 Women’s Sports Foundation report, “How Tennis Influences Youth Development,” found that among the top 10 most popular sports, tennis has the most “healthy high achievers”: students who had the highest level of academic achievement, lowest prevalence of substance use, lowest school misbehavior, highest prevalence of health behaviors, and highest level of psychological health. FSNM helps each child to overcome these enormous obstacles and change their focus to positivity for themselves, setting small, achievable goals in which they can continually find success. It takes years for this profound effect to occur. FSNM has created a family for our students. For many students, we are their only family, and for other students, we are their extended family. FSNM cannot cure the trauma that a child has experienced, but we can build a new tent of opportunities and work to help each child build their confidence and self-worth.


Grant Application
First Serve - NM, Inc.
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Support Two Students in the FS-NM After-School Program for 2021-22
$320,074.00
$5,000.00
1.56%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Grant funding will allow two students to participate in the FSNM after school program which combines rigorous academic tutoring, life skills instruction, and intensive tennis training.
FSNM is a microcosm of the student population of the US, exhibiting the myriad of developmental, socio-emotional, and home-life problems that plague children across the country. Santa Fe exhibits some of the lowest school outcomes in the nation, combined with indicators of poor physical and emotional health such as obesity, diabetes, substance abuse and suicide. In the 2017 Santa Fe Youth Summit Report, youth indicated that there is a lack of physical education in schools, and that this has contributed to poor physical and mental health. The 2019 Women’s Sports Foundation report, “How Tennis Influences Youth Development,” found that among the top 10 most popular sports, tennis has the most “healthy high achievers”: students who had the highest level of academic achievement, lowest prevalence of substance use, lowest school misbehavior, highest prevalence of health behaviors, and highest level of psychological health. FSNM helps each child to overcome these enormous obstacles and change their focus to positivity for themselves, setting small, achievable goals in which they can continually find success. It takes years for this profound effect to occur. FSNM has created a family for our students. For many students, we are their only family, and for other students, we are their extended family. FSNM cannot cure the trauma that a child has experienced, but we can build a new tent of opportunities and work to help each child build their confidence and self-worth.
FSNM operates with a staff of qualified, paid independent contractors delivering academic tutoring, life skills instruction, and PTR-certified tennis training. Many of our contractors are teachers within the Santa Fe Public Schools. We offer our after school program 5 days per week throughout the academic year. In addition, FSNM offers a 10-week summer tennis and reading camp that runs from early June through mid-August. Most of the FSNM operating budget is earmarked to pay our highly-qualified contractor staff. We have low administrative overhead, as the executive director has been and is currently serving on a volunteer basis. Administrative activities are conducted from her home, as FSNM does not have an office. Promotional expenses are largely donated by the executive director and president. As such, the vast majority of funds raised are spent directly on student services.
FSNM maintains meticulous records on each student consisting of quarterly grade reports along with comments from tutors, teachers, tennis instructors, parents, and the students themselves. Student progress is thus continually monitored.
2
Bridges Project for Education

Bridges Project expands postsecondary access for people of all ages, with an emphasis on students who are the first generation in their families to seek vocational certificates and degrees.


Bridges’ vision is to help our clients enhance their ability to improve their lives and that of their families, and by extension contribute positively to the broader economy and social welfare of our community. Since 1997, we’ve served 3,000+ clients. Bridges accomplishes this by aligning our programming with three goals. While the goals are somewhat sequential, there's exchange between them. (1) Students will have accurate information, early enough, and will develop vision and agency to actively choose an appropriate postsecondary path. (2) Students who choose to pursue a postsecondary education path will complete the essential steps to access a school that's affordable and a good fit. (3) Those who enroll will complete their program and contribute back to the Taos community. Bridges programs include: College Connections, an early engagement pilot program; free individualized counseling providing guidance through the admissions and financial aid process; and support for Bridges’ alumni to increase certificate and degree completion. For many, education must take a back seat as families struggle to satisfy their basic needs. Schools have fewer funds to hire college counselors, and parents whose transition to adulthood did not include postsecondary education can find it difficult to guide their own children toward an unfamiliar experience. Without additional support, the cycle continues, with each generation increasingly marginalized by fewer options and opportunities.


Grant Application
Bridges Project for Education
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Bridges Project for Education
$167,660.00
$15,000.00
8.95%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Bridges Project expands postsecondary access for people of all ages, with an emphasis on students who are the first generation in their families to seek vocational certificates and degrees.
Bridges’ vision is to help our clients enhance their ability to improve their lives and that of their families, and by extension contribute positively to the broader economy and social welfare of our community. Since 1997, we’ve served 3,000+ clients. Bridges accomplishes this by aligning our programming with three goals. While the goals are somewhat sequential, there's exchange between them. (1) Students will have accurate information, early enough, and will develop vision and agency to actively choose an appropriate postsecondary path. (2) Students who choose to pursue a postsecondary education path will complete the essential steps to access a school that's affordable and a good fit. (3) Those who enroll will complete their program and contribute back to the Taos community. Bridges programs include: College Connections, an early engagement pilot program; free individualized counseling providing guidance through the admissions and financial aid process; and support for Bridges’ alumni to increase certificate and degree completion. For many, education must take a back seat as families struggle to satisfy their basic needs. Schools have fewer funds to hire college counselors, and parents whose transition to adulthood did not include postsecondary education can find it difficult to guide their own children toward an unfamiliar experience. Without additional support, the cycle continues, with each generation increasingly marginalized by fewer options and opportunities.
Bridges is grateful for the opportunity to apply to the FHL Foundation for general operating support. With two full-time staff members and a small budget under $200,000, Bridges accomplishes a great deal. We intensively counsel approximately 100 students annually, seeing each client an average of 5 times and serve nearly 500 additional students through classroom presentations. The majority of Bridges' budget is personnel, as our approach is highly personalized and one-on-one.
The metric we would like to use to measure the progress of our postsecondary access program is the number of students who will receive individualized counseling. We expect that 100 students will receive individualized postsecondary counseling.
100
Housing, Education Support, & Life Skills Academy for Homeless Youth

Casa Q seeks funding to support the educational success of the youth we serve. Because of COVID-19, we are seeing an increased need for educational, cultural, and social engagement for our youth.


The mission of Casa Q is to provide safe living options and services for LGBTQ+ youth and allies ages 14-22 who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness. Casa Q's 5-bedroom house is licensed by the state's Children, Youth and Families Department as a Multi-Service Home to serve up to 10 residents at a time. Casa Q not only provides housing, but also educational support, career exploration services, and assistance finding a first job or internship. While a resident in the house, youth are supported by experienced and trained staff to succeed in school, explore career options, learn a range of essential life skills, and engage with their community through cultural, educational, and social enrichment activities. The youth served by Casa Q are some of the most at-risk for dropping out of school, self-harm, mental health emergencies, and long-term homelessness. Casa Q intervenes in what can be a destructive cycle by housing these youth in a protective, compassionate, and supportive environment and by providing a range of services and experienced staff to help them develop and determine their future successfully. Staff welcome the youth into the house and help them with their schooling, counseling, and healthcare appointments. All daily needs such as food, clothing, school supplies, and toiletries are provided. Each young person has individualized goals and staff help them heal, learn, and develop life skills.


Grant Application
Casa Q, Inc.
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Housing, Education Support, & Life Skills Academy for Homeless Youth
$465,083.00
$10,000.00
2.15%
General Operations
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Casa Q seeks funding to support the educational success of the youth we serve. Because of COVID-19, we are seeing an increased need for educational, cultural, and social engagement for our youth.
The mission of Casa Q is to provide safe living options and services for LGBTQ+ youth and allies ages 14-22 who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness. Casa Q's 5-bedroom house is licensed by the state's Children, Youth and Families Department as a Multi-Service Home to serve up to 10 residents at a time. Casa Q not only provides housing, but also educational support, career exploration services, and assistance finding a first job or internship. While a resident in the house, youth are supported by experienced and trained staff to succeed in school, explore career options, learn a range of essential life skills, and engage with their community through cultural, educational, and social enrichment activities. The youth served by Casa Q are some of the most at-risk for dropping out of school, self-harm, mental health emergencies, and long-term homelessness. Casa Q intervenes in what can be a destructive cycle by housing these youth in a protective, compassionate, and supportive environment and by providing a range of services and experienced staff to help them develop and determine their future successfully. Staff welcome the youth into the house and help them with their schooling, counseling, and healthcare appointments. All daily needs such as food, clothing, school supplies, and toiletries are provided. Each young person has individualized goals and staff help them heal, learn, and develop life skills.
$6,600 for Housing, Education, and Life Skills Academy for Residents and Aftercare $3,400 for Program Staff Support, Training, and CEUs Program Staff play a vital role in providing a safe, stable, and productive environment for the youth at the house and in managing the Life Skills Academy programming. Caring Casa Q staff and positive youth support activities ensure that teens who have experienced trauma and abuse, mental health challenges, lack of family support, and homelessness have a path to independence, educational success, self-sustainable employment, and self-confident community engagement. Because of COVID-19, our staff have been working hard to ensure that all of the Casa Q youth are supported in their virtual schooling. Although it’s been very challenging, we are proud of our agility as an organization and our ability to continue serving the young people who need the safety and security that we provide.
100% of youth living in the Casa Q house attend school or engage in online educational classes, attaining C or above grades in order to begin their employment case plan & will engage in our Life Skills Academy.
100
Bakery Expansion

Camino de Paz is currently in its largest expansion since opening day, expanding capacity in learning environments and business activities. The new bakery is crucial to operations and this expansion.


Camino de Paz believes in the potential of every adolescent and supports young people in gaining economic independence. Though the school operates legitimate businesses, the community doesn’t view CdP as a trade school, but rather as an institution that provides one of the best educations in NM. The CdP experience for adolescents always features an 'economic work' component. That work is designed to receive a real marketplace valuation. Middle schoolers are often at the developmental stage in learning work skills, so their work rarely stands alone in the competitive marketplace. Moreover, their communal identity and sociological connection to coworkers often requires more time to form and flourish. Thus, the school seeks outside funds to subsidize this work effort as an important aspect of their education. This is critical as students move into the high school program and play a more impactful role in the local economy. The expanded bakery is a major arm in this sustainable, educational business model, as it can operate comfortably year-round.


Grant Application
Camino de Paz School & Farm
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Bakery Expansion
$288,942.00
$25,000.00
8.65%
Capacity Building
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Camino de Paz is currently in its largest expansion since opening day, expanding capacity in learning environments and business activities. The new bakery is crucial to operations and this expansion.
Camino de Paz believes in the potential of every adolescent and supports young people in gaining economic independence. Though the school operates legitimate businesses, the community doesn’t view CdP as a trade school, but rather as an institution that provides one of the best educations in NM. The CdP experience for adolescents always features an 'economic work' component. That work is designed to receive a real marketplace valuation. Middle schoolers are often at the developmental stage in learning work skills, so their work rarely stands alone in the competitive marketplace. Moreover, their communal identity and sociological connection to coworkers often requires more time to form and flourish. Thus, the school seeks outside funds to subsidize this work effort as an important aspect of their education. This is critical as students move into the high school program and play a more impactful role in the local economy. The expanded bakery is a major arm in this sustainable, educational business model, as it can operate comfortably year-round.
The student work program has a projected budget of $300,000 over 3 years. Depending on age and readiness, students are paid $10-$12/hr for 8 hours of work per week, with a full-time option for 4-6 weeks in the summer. From this, 80% of pre-tax student income goes to tuition and 20% becomes cash for the student. In this way, students boost real household income from $30K to $37K. Students have already pre-sold $150,000 of baked goods to various distribution channels for this first year and everyone is eager to fulfill these goals. As seen in the attached document (please see email to Martina Games from March 18), CdP will cover $64,192 of the total project budget costs, which include the full-time salary for a Head Baker and most of the bakery equipment. Supplemental costs are being sought from FHL Foundation and others to cover construction costs, which are just under $200,000.
Sales of baked goods
1
Student Scientists in the Bosque: Education and Stewardship for Our Future

The Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program (BEMP) provides unique and engaging environmental education, community science, and ecological stewardship activities for K-12 students in Bernalillo County.


For 25 years, over 100,000 students in grades K-12 have learned about the Middle Rio Grande bosque and collected millions of data points to measure its health alongside BEMP staff. Students collect information about precipitation, groundwater depth, vegetation, and water quality to evaluate ecosystem health. BEMP is the only organization in New Mexico providing a network of 33 established bosque monitoring sites across 270 miles of the Middle Rio Grande. Through our programming, students become community scientists. BEMP students include children and youth from socio-economic and cultural backgrounds that are underrepresented in science and technology fields and underserved by environmental education programs. Over the grant period, BEMP will provide skills-building opportunities for students, support for teachers, and crucial bosque ecosystem data. BEMP students learn how to collect and analyze data, work in teams, communicate complex science effectively, and understand and appreciate the interconnectedness of ecosystems and habitats. BEMP provides everything teachers and students need to engage in environmental education, including transportation, supplies, and bilingual curriculum (Spanish and English). Local and federal entities like the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps or Engineers, and tribal governments use student-collected data to inform resource use and stewardship practices and policies.


Grant Application
Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Student Scientists in the Bosque: Education and Stewardship for Our Future
$267,740.00
$10,000.00
3.73%
Program Support
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
The Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program (BEMP) provides unique and engaging environmental education, community science, and ecological stewardship activities for K-12 students in Bernalillo County.
For 25 years, over 100,000 students in grades K-12 have learned about the Middle Rio Grande bosque and collected millions of data points to measure its health alongside BEMP staff. Students collect information about precipitation, groundwater depth, vegetation, and water quality to evaluate ecosystem health. BEMP is the only organization in New Mexico providing a network of 33 established bosque monitoring sites across 270 miles of the Middle Rio Grande. Through our programming, students become community scientists. BEMP students include children and youth from socio-economic and cultural backgrounds that are underrepresented in science and technology fields and underserved by environmental education programs. Over the grant period, BEMP will provide skills-building opportunities for students, support for teachers, and crucial bosque ecosystem data. BEMP students learn how to collect and analyze data, work in teams, communicate complex science effectively, and understand and appreciate the interconnectedness of ecosystems and habitats. BEMP provides everything teachers and students need to engage in environmental education, including transportation, supplies, and bilingual curriculum (Spanish and English). Local and federal entities like the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps or Engineers, and tribal governments use student-collected data to inform resource use and stewardship practices and policies.
FHL Foundation funds will support our environmental education program. Our 2021 program budget is detailed below: -Two educators to guide students through interactive environmental education activities in the bosque, including taxes & benefits = $117,600 -Two biologists to inform program development and oversee data analysis, including taxes and benefits = $120,800 -Travel cost for BEMP staff to and from local schools and bosque data collection sites = $2,000 -Delivery of programming, including student transportation, printing, and curriculum translation = $3,000. -Subtotal = $243,400 -10% overhead/administrative costs to support programming = $24,340 -Total environmental education program budget = $267,740 A $10,000 grant will support our continued work to engage students from a wide variety of socioeconomic backgrounds and racial identities in environmental education focused on the bosque. As a newly-independent nonprofit, our funding partners make our work possible. We look forward to partnering with the FHL Foundation to ensure New Mexican students succeed in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) subjects.
Over the grant period, BEMP will track hours of activities provided. We will provide K-12 students with 800 hours of intensive classes and 3,000 hours of stand-alone activities for teachers to lead on their own or with BEMP involvement.
3,800
Improving experiences for undergraduate students

Undergraduate student demands for immersive college experiences and career-focused readiness keep rising. FHL Foundation can name and provide start-up for NSM’s first undergraduate research fund.


Robust undergraduate research programs are features of progressive higher education institutions seeking to attract talented students interested in solving tomorrow’s challenges. The grant would direct research-related support to undergraduate students who receive one-on-one mentorship from faculty mentors across NSM’s six departments and four centers; undertaking vibrant research in disease treatment efficacy, industry-linked data analytics, environmental hazards, sustainable energy plus so much more. Through NSM’s Office of Undergraduate Education, invitations of interest would be issued to both undergraduate students and faculty mentors. Guidelines for the identification of program participants with established criteria will ensure transparency and equity. These competitive processes encourage strong candidate selection and the best likely stated metrics achieved. Successful program completion allows students to gain new hard and soft skills towards their chosen academic fields of interest. NSM is focused on ensuring our enthusiastic learners are ready for the next phase of their careers. The Foundation, like UT Dallas was built on industry and science working closely together; providing value to communities. The proposal is pleased to also include consideration of a naming opportunity to create the Frederick H. Leonhardt Foundation Lounge. Here, the Foundation’s investment can catapult additional partner linkages that can further improve student success.


Grant Application
University of Texas at Dallas (UTD or UT Dallas)
Spring 2021 Grant Cycle
Improving experiences for undergraduate students
$150,000.00
$50,000.00
33.33%
Start-Up
Mar. 1st, 2021
Mar. 31st, 2021
Undergraduate student demands for immersive college experiences and career-focused readiness keep rising. FHL Foundation can name and provide start-up for NSM’s first undergraduate research fund.
Robust undergraduate research programs are features of progressive higher education institutions seeking to attract talented students interested in solving tomorrow’s challenges. The grant would direct research-related support to undergraduate students who receive one-on-one mentorship from faculty mentors across NSM’s six departments and four centers; undertaking vibrant research in disease treatment efficacy, industry-linked data analytics, environmental hazards, sustainable energy plus so much more. Through NSM’s Office of Undergraduate Education, invitations of interest would be issued to both undergraduate students and faculty mentors. Guidelines for the identification of program participants with established criteria will ensure transparency and equity. These competitive processes encourage strong candidate selection and the best likely stated metrics achieved. Successful program completion allows students to gain new hard and soft skills towards their chosen academic fields of interest. NSM is focused on ensuring our enthusiastic learners are ready for the next phase of their careers. The Foundation, like UT Dallas was built on industry and science working closely together; providing value to communities. The proposal is pleased to also include consideration of a naming opportunity to create the Frederick H. Leonhardt Foundation Lounge. Here, the Foundation’s investment can catapult additional partner linkages that can further improve student success.
Allocation of grant funds for student-faculty pairs are as follows: Student stipends of $500 are distributed to four students weekly for a period of 10 weeks over the summer semester. Stipends are incentives to students to help cover the costs of their basic needs during the summer months. This is expected to be a total of $20,000. Travel allowances or approved reimbursable costs are allocated for related student research activities such as field visits. In addition, it covers trips to present at scientific symposia where students can gain insight from and network with professional contacts as well as explore opportunities about academic and career options. An allowance of $1,000 is allotted for each student and $1,250 for each faculty. This is expected to be a total of $9,000. Faculty mentor stipends of $2,250 are allocated as a single cost for the entire 10-week program to each of the four researchers. This serves as an incentive to gain the participation of tenure-track and non-tenured faculty who are very research active. The total expected cost is $9,000. Costs are estimated for chemicals, materials and instrumentation to support students' activities. This is allocated at $3,000 for each of the four students and is expected to be a total of $12,000. A total of $50,000 is expected to support the four student-faculty pairs annually. If awarded for three years, the total value of the investment to NSM would be $150,000.
Objective 1: Advance 4 undergraduate research projects in NSM that solve real-world challenges Objective 2: Equip 4 undergraduate students with skills to thrive in their academic and professional pursuits
4